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Panda celebrities.

Meng Meng and Jiao Qing were greeted like guests of state when they arrived in Berlin-Schönefeld in July. Lufthansa Cargo spared no effort in ensuring the safe transport and welfare of these rare bears.

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Jiao Qing.

The male panda, Jiao Qing (pronounced: Jiao Tsching), which translates as “little darling,” was born in Chengdu on July 15, 2010 and weighs in at an impressive 108 kilograms. He is not only rather inquisitive and mischievous but also relatively active, which is unusual for a panda. As one would expect from a true panda bear, he can be quite querulous and remonstrative if he has to wait too long for his bamboo shoots.

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Meng Meng.

A round face and a short snout? That can only be the female panda Meng Meng (“little dream”)! The animal keepers at Berlin’s Zoo have been hard at work practising the correct pronunciation: “Möng Möng.” This mild-mannered and docile bear was born in Chengdu on July 10, 2013 and weighs around 77 kilograms.

Protecting pandas is our highest priority.

Protecting pandas is our highest priority.

Dark button eyes, round faces and furry ears – it is almost impossible to resist the charms of these black-and-white creatures. But the future of these rare bears is threatened and they are still considered a vulnerable species: 1,864 giant pandas live in the wild and only 54 in zoos outside China. Accordingly, there was frenzied interest from onlookers as two of these treasured animals landed at Berlin-Schönefeld on June 24, touching down at 2.53 pm on flight LH 8415. The Lufthansa Cargo MD-11F was specially rerouted from Chengdu as the regular flight schedule from there is only expected to recommence in January 2018. Meng Meng and Jiao Qing were greeted like guests of state. The airport’s fire service saluted the freighter with a plume of water and the cockpit crew waved a German and a Chinese flag in front of some 30 journalists assembled on the apron. The two giant pandas seemed unimpressed by all the hoopla. They gazed around with interest, obviously having enjoyed their twelvehour flight. Hardly surprising, considering the couple received first-class treatment on board – including round-the-clock supervision from Dr. Andreas Ochs, chief veterinarian at the Berlin Zoo, and two handlers from China. There were also enough in-flight snacks to keep them happy: the MD-11F had loaded one tonne of bamboo. 

Upon arrival, the pandas were greeted by numerous prominent figures, among them China’s Ambassador to Berlin, Shi Mingde, Berlin’s Mayor, Michael Müller, and Berlin Zoo director Andreas Knieriem. The welcoming committee also included Alexis von Hoensbroech, Board Member Product and Sales at Lufthansa Cargo. 

Mayor Müller said: “I take great personal pride in welcoming our two new Berliners. We’re very pleased to see Berlin being graced by another great attraction.” Shi Mingde explained the phenomenon behind pandas, saying: “In China, pandas are regarded as a national treasure. China without pandas is simply inconceivable, which is why the preservation and protection of these animals is our highest priority.”

Meng Meng and Jiao Qing were later driven to their new home, an enclosure in Berlin’s Zoo that cost ten million euros and was approved by a Chinese delegation. The two bears, the only pandas in Germany, are on loan for 15 years. Berlin Zoo will pay 920,000 euros a year to host them, with 90 percent of the money being invested in panda protection and breeding research. Given the cost, the zoo hopes that the exotic couple will ultimately produce a cub.

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The man in charge of this precious freight on behalf of Lufthansa Cargo was Wolfgang Handke from the Sales Team Berlin, who joined the airline in 1982 and accompanied a panda-flight in the 1990s. The responsible parties on the Chinese side were Yuan Fang, Head of Handling Northern Asia, and Hasso Schmidt, Head of Sales & Handling Eastern China, who has also been with Lufthansa since 1982. “The whole operation was a great team effort by both countries. The same goes for the coordination outside of our hubs,” said Handke. Everything had to be run by him: from visas for the accompanying handlers to communications with customs and plant protection for the bamboo on board right up to coordinating the freighter’s parking position with Schönefeld airport. “It’s better when one person is involved in everything, it makes things a whole lot simpler,” the sales manager explained. When the pandas leave Berlin in 15 years, he will likely not be involved. “Organizing a second transport for giant pandas is a lovely end to a career. I’ll probably be retired by the time the next pandas arrive.”

Shi Mingde, the Chinese Ambassador to Berlin, called the two panda bears “national treasures.” Accordingly, the official unveiling of the new panda enclosure attracted highranking guests: seen here are Chancellor Angela Merkel and China’s President, Xi Jinping.

 

Photos:
Lufthansa Cargo, Zoo Berlin, Frederic Schweizer
Planet 2/2017


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Hyper agility.

MR. DIREKTOR: WILL WARR HYPERLOOP SOON BE BUILDING A TUBE ACROSS THE ATLANTIC OCEAN AND TAKE THE TRANSATLANTIC BUSINESS AWAY FROM THE FREIGHT AIRLINES?
Paul Direktor: Perhaps next year. However, on a more serious note Hyperloop is not competing with airfreight. Moreover, in the future it could supplement it, for example as an express or supply solution to render airfreight hubs even more efficient.

Dorothea von Boxberg: Hyperloop could, in particular, replace transport operations on the road in particularly heavily congested transport areas. Short and medium-range routes are the field in which Hyperloop solutions could prove successful. One shouldn’t forget that Elon Musk’s longest tube is currently only a little more than one kilometer.

Paul Direktor: In Switzerland, a university team at ETH Zurich is already working on implementing a package transport system using vacuum pipe technology. It is called Swissloop and the Swiss are, of course, renowned for tunnel building.

Dorothea von Boxberg: Hyperloop is not a technology set to be commercialized on the market in the near future. However, the number of ideas that have been developed in that respect in the past few years is impressive. Hyperloop taking on the “last leg” from an airport to a major city could, for example, considerably speed up e-commerce consignments.

WHAT DO YOU FIND FASCINATING ABOUT THE “SPACEX HYPERLOOP POD COMPETITION”?
Paul Direktor: It gives us the opportunity to build something completely new. We are, so to speak, spearheading technical innovation. Following the initial successes, industry started to take an interest in and support us. Practical experience like that is not taught at university. Simply fantastic.

Dorothea von Boxberg: It is fascinating to see how these selforganized student teams have developed their ideas with such success, above all if I compare that with the typical project periods in major groups.

WHAT WAS THE CRUCIAL EXPERIENCE FOR YOU WHEN YOUR STUDENT INITIATIVE SUDDENLY HAD TO COLLABORATE WITH SUPPORTERS FROM INDUSTRY?

Paul Direktor: The times. Internal processing times of more than four weeks for example are completely normal for invoices at many companies. In such a four-week period just about anything can happen to us.

WHAT IS NEW ABOUT THE CURRENT HYPERLOOP CONCEPTS COMPARED TO THOSE 15 YEARS AGO SUCH AS THE CARGO CAP, WHICH WE HAVE REPORTED ON IN “PLANET” IN THE PAST?
Paul Direktor: Above all the vacuum technology, which facilitates far higher speeds, is new. In addition, the commitment of a renowned entrepreneur, i.e. in our case Elon Musk, who with lasting effect supports the implementation and attracts global attention.

CRITICS SAY MUSK IS MAKING TOO MUCH OF A SONG AND DANCE ABOUT IT
Paul Direktor: That’s something people need to decide for themselves. At any rate I am fascinated by his successes – how he manages to revolutionize the market with his electric cars, that’s great. As soon as the mass production problems are ironed out we’ll see how good he really is. SpaceX has already generated profits for a number of years too.

Dorothea von Boxberg: He is an impressive visionary. Many of his ideas are not incremental improvements, but moreover moonshot ideas. The path to a sustainable business in that respect is significantly more difficult than in the case of smaller innovations. His company Tesla has definitely seriously shaken up the automotive industry.

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A part of the team with their current pod, which in July this year won the 3rd Hyperloop Pod Competition achieving a speed of 467 km/h. In addition to the speed team, WARR Hyperloop has a levitation team, which was similarly successful and intends to make use of the Transrapid technology.

WHAT INTERESTS DO LUFTHANSA CARGO AND WARR HYPERLOOP SHARE? DO YOU INTEND TO INVEST MS. VON BOXBERG?
Dorothea von Boxberg: WARR Hyperloop is a student initiative, not a start-up. Accordingly at present we couldn’t make an investment. We are supporting the students because we are interested in exchanging ideas about technology and people who demonstrate commitment and such great skills.

Paul Direktor: Lufthansa Cargo is a global company with a good network. We are interested in exchanging know-how and developing first business cases for Germany.

SO IT’S NOT ONLY ABOUT PR?
Paul Direktor: PR plays a part but isn’t everything. It must be interesting for Lufthansa Cargo and for the entire logistics sector to know what is happening in the Hyperloop industry to react accordingly in good time.

Dorothea von Boxberg: We had already established contact with the WARR Hyperloop team before the sponsored events. But if someone wants to interpret that simply as PR I won’t disabuse them of that notion.

WHAT INNOVATIVE IDEAS IN THE LOGISTICS SECTOR BEYOND HYPERLOOP DO YOU CURRENTLY FIND EXCITING?
Paul Direktor: There are lots of ideas. I believe Blockchain has great potential for validating delivery chains. That is exciting for the airfreight sector, which is strongly characterized by the division of labour and has many players who are widely spread. Amazon’s Beehive could revolutionize warehouse logistics. This also includes the swarm intelligence of drones.

 

HOWEVER, THE LOGISTICS SECTOR IS NOT EXACTLY REGARDED AS A MODEL OF INNOVATIVE PASSION 
Dorothea von Boxberg: True. Some topics really take forever. For example the roll-out of the eAir Waybill. Paul Direktor: All sectors are currently undergoing significant changes as a result of digitization. Logistics are no exception and will need to adjust accordingly.

Dorothea von Boxberg: We are doing that. I believe artificial intelligence is the technology that we will use first at Lufthansa Cargo. In that respect among other things this means self-learning algorithms can determine prices and automatically allocate freight to free capacities. Some of our services are already being rendered via API interfaces and these are used by several platforms to present an overview so that ranges can be compared. In other industries that’s nothing special. However, in airfreight it is quite innovative. My general aim consists of making our range available to our customers effectively and simply. We have quite a lot of work ahead of us. 

WHAT DID YOUR VISIT TO WARR HYPERLOOP MEAN FOR YOU IN RESPECT OF ADDRESSING THE CURRENT LUFTHANSA CARGO AGENDA? 
Dorothea von Boxberg: The spirit is great and it supplements that of the legendary cargo very well. At present we are working on making our range more digital and more easily available. The airfreight industry has, to date, been characterised by a large number of manual processes: booking, quoting prices and the information flow, which accompanies a physical consignment. As a result our customers do not receive real time information. Often transparency is lacking and mistakes are made. We hope to improve that significantly in the next few years.

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The first WARR Hyperloop pod was a success thanks to its design. At the front it has a compressor that minimizes the air resistance in a partial vacuum tube.

MS. VON BOXBERG, YOU ARE THE NEW EXECUTIVE BOARD MEMBER AND CHIEF COMMERCIAL OFFICER. WHAT CAN ONE LEARN FOR THE PRODUCT FROM INITIATIVES SUCH AS WARR HYPERLOOP OR STARTUPS?
Dorothea von Boxberg: Successful products are geared towards customers’ requirements and are supplied in the promised quality. Start-ups show us that a product doesn’t need to be absolutely perfect when it is launched on the market for the first time. Valuable experience can, in fact, be gained with a quick “minimum viable product” while the product can then be further improved. In that respect customers only need to know what they are letting themselves in for.

IS AN EXCHANGE WITH A START-UP IMPORTANT TO BE OF INTEREST TO TALENTED YOUNG PROFESSIONALS?
Dorothea von Boxberg: “Employer branding” is not the principal aspect of our exchange. We attach prime importance to the actual ideas, technologies, approach, the fact that fast growth is possible and the working method. On occasion in our sector we have grown too accustomed to the fact that things require a certain time. It is very refreshing to realize that students or start-ups prove the opposite is the case. Being in the company of “digital natives” is also good training for me personally.

AT PRESENT THE NEWS IS INCREASINGLY CHARACTERIZED BY NEGATIVE ECONOMIC REPORTS SUCH AS PUNITIVE TARIFFS AND EU SCEPTICISM ETC. IS THERE ANY ROOM LEFT FOR INNOVATORS LIKE YOU MR. DIREKTOR? 
Paul Direktor: A functioning market economy should always have room for innovation and an atmosphere for change. Otherwise that would be a very bad sign. 

ARE YOU INVOLVED IN WARR HYPERLOOP TO GET RICH AT SOME POINT? 
Paul Direktor: No. I am enthusiastic about the project. At present, in addition to our university courses we work on the project in our leisure time, many of us for more than 60 hours each week – even though we are not paid for it. 

IS A CULTURAL CHANGE POSSIBLE IN A TRADITIONAL COMPANY SUCH AS LUFTHANSA CARGO? 
Dorothea von Boxberg: We have changed a great deal in the last few years: the organization, our processes, we collaborate with start-ups in a more targeted manner and in the case of projects we are increasingly moving from a waterfall approach to agile development. And the change will continue – we are in the middle of it. 

THANK YOU FOR YOUR TIME!

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That also impressed Elon Musk: WARR Hyperloop’s third pod was faster than the pusher pod of SpaceX and Tesla.

Photos: WARR Hyperloop, Matthias Aletsee

Planet 2/2018


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Konnichiwa „Bojo“!

It is a drop like no other, because it is the first of every vintage to be served up: the French Beaujolais Nouveau. Also known as Beaujolais Primeur, or “Bojo” for short, this red wine has traditionally come on the market on the third Thursday in November ever since 1985. “Le Beaujolais Nouveau est arrivé” is the message that then spreads through wine shops around the world. The idea originated with the winegrowers in Beaujolais, which under French “wine law” is part of Burgundy. In the 1950s, they successfully fought for an exemption from the strict French wine law. They became the first to be permitted to sell their wine already in the year it was made. There was a time when British high society folk flew their private planes to Burgundy to get the very first new wine from France for themselves and their friends. Today the “Bojo” goes to more than 110 countries around the world by airfreight. About 13 million bottles are filled each year.

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More than half goes to Japan. This year Lufthansa Cargo will again ship about 600 tons of this sought-after drop to the Land of the Rising Sun. The “Bojo” from Beaujolais arrives at Frankfurt Airport (FRA) on the Road Feeder Service. The challenge: to have this entire volume of freight shipped to Osaka (KIX) and Tokyo (NRT) within a period of three weeks, so that it will be on the shelves of Japanese wine merchants and ready for sale in mid-November. Lufthansa Cargo therefore sends about 50 tons of “Bojo” each day, both on board its own aircraft and in the cargo holds of Lufthansa passenger aircraft heading for Asia. In the belly of a LH740, for example, a Boeing 747-400 that is bound for Osaka. After a journey of just under twelve hours, the young wine lands in Japan. Cooperation partner All Nippon Airways supplements the services offered by Lufthansa Cargo with a further 1,200 tons of freight capacity.

Photos: iStock

Planet 2/2018


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Rapid. Guaranteed.

“Time is money” always holds true in logistics, but the motto applies in particular when, for example, vital spare parts for the shipping, oil and gas industries are involved.

Emergency.Solutions is the name of the new Lufthansa Cargo product for urgent cases. ­Anyone who chooses this option is even provided, if necessary, with an entire freighter.

With Emergency.Solutions, Lufthansa Cargo guarantees that the express shipment is taken to its destination with the next possible flight.

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A helicopter whirrs over the Kuehne + Nagel site in the bay of Tananger on its way to one of the oil rigs out in the North Sea. Moored special-purpose ships sway in the icy fall wind. Anyone driving from here by car through the Nordic landscape to nearby Stavanger, passing wooden huts and crossing a fjord bridge, does not get the impression of being in the center of the Norwegian oil industry. There is very little indication that specialist firms and warehouses in the region produce and stock extremely important parts for the oil, gas and shipping industries all over the world. Desktop Kuehne + Nagel is a long-standing partner of many of the firms that are based here. The logistics service provider has 80 employees stationed near Stavanger, 16 of whom work in airfreight.

Alongside the office building, the warehouse is located in which numerous individual parts are stored: pump accessories, compressors, drill heads, steel cables, electronics parts, and a whole lot more. If one of these parts breaks down in field operations anywhere in the world, there is red alert.

Replacement material from Stavanger, for example, has to be made available within the shortest possible time. If an oil rig has to shut down or if a ship is held up somewhere, every hour of delay means additional costs of many thousands of euros.

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“Particularly in the oil & gas and ships spares segment, we have a lot of urgent shipments,” says Synnøve Thormodsæter from Bergen. She is responsible for airfreight at Kuehne + Nagel in Norway. “Logistically, our job is particularly ­complicated when it comes to large and outsized parts,” she explains more specifically. In such cases, the phones don’t stop ringing. A lot of organizing and improvizing is required. Under pressure, various options have to be checked and immediate decisions taken.

Fast and absolutely reliable.

Lufthansa Cargo has repeatedly been confronted with emergency situations and correspodingly urgent assignments from a variety of industries during recent years – alongside shipbuilding and the oil and gas industry, also from the the automotive, aviation and mechanical engineering segments.

The company therefore decided to offer a product that specifically caters to such cases. Its desired qualities: highest priority, short-term availability and absolutely reliable.

The result: Emergency.Solutions.

“In addition, our product management developed intelligent ground processes under the keyword ‘planned emergency situation’ in order to reduce improvisation to a minimum in an emergency case,” explains Christoph Harneid, Country Manager Norway at Lufthansa Cargo.

Although it is impossible to predict all imponderabilities of emergency situations, defined procedures ­accelerate the process and reduce the need for decisions.

In Emergency.Solutions, Lufthansa Cargo guarantees that the express shipment is taken at short notice to its destination on the next possible flight.

“We ensure that short-term access is guaranteed for an Emergency.Solutions shipment. In an absolute emergency, we would even make an entire freighter available,” says Harneid. The cargo airline brings along the best credentials for such an exquisite premium ­product. Lufthansa Cargo has employees with the necessary experience to resolve related tasks and offer comparable processes and also has a route network with short-term connections to destinations worldwide. As most flights are established scheduled flights, landing permissions or aircraft do not, as a rule, have to be additionally organized.

The transfer times at the airport are kept extremely short thanks to well-coordinated processes. The direct transshipment from one aircraft to another is ensured without having to take the detour via the transit warehouse.

If required, the Lufthansa Cargo Charter Agency is also involved in the process. The shipment thus stays “under one roof” and can be shipped with just one air waybill and one invoicing channel. This reduces complexity and simplifies the processes. And a team in Frankfurt keeps an eye on the shipment during its entire transportation.

Since the end of 2011, Emergency.Solutions has been offered on a test basis by a number of German, European and North American stations – also on the Norwegian market. “Last year, we had about 120 assignments. In the medium term, we expect 300 to 400 cases per year,” says Harneid.

The reactions so far on the customer side have been extremely positive. For this reason, the product has been officially offered worldwide since October 1, 2012. From Stavanger, urgent shipments are transported to the airport by truck, to reach the best connections.

“From there, they are flown by the next aircraft towards the destination, where the formalities are clarified in advance,” explains Harneid. “ Up to now, the only possibility we often had in the case of heavy and large shipments was to organize a direct charter flight,” says ­Thormodsæter.

Lufthansa Cargo also – if necessary – falls back on charter flights in the framework of Emergency.Solutions. The charter segment is combined here with scheduled flights. That saves time and costs.

Fast and absolutely reliable.

Lufthansa Cargo has repeatedly been confronted with emergency situations and correspodingly urgent assignments from a variety of industries during recent years – alongside shipbuilding and the oil and gas industry, also from the the automotive, aviation and mechanical engineering segments.

The company therefore decided to offer a product that specifically caters to such cases. Its desired qualities: highest priority, short-term availability and absolutely reliable.

The result: Emergency.Solutions.

“In addition, our product management developed intelligent ground processes under the keyword ‘planned emergency situation’ in order to reduce improvisation to a minimum in an emergency case,” explains Christoph Harneid, Country Manager Norway at Lufthansa Cargo.

Although it is impossible to predict all imponderabilities of emergency situations, defined procedures ­accelerate the process and reduce the need for decisions. In Emergency.Solutions, Lufthansa Cargo guarantees that the express shipment is taken at short notice to its destination on the next possible flight.

“We ensure that short-term access is guaranteed for an Emergency.Solutions shipment. In an absolute emergency, we would even make an entire freighter available,” says Harneid. The cargo airline brings along the best credentials for such an exquisite premium ­product. Lufthansa Cargo has employees with the necessary experience to resolve related tasks and offer comparable processes and also has a route network with short-term connections to destinations worldwide. As most flights are established scheduled flights, landing permissions or aircraft do not, as a rule, have to be additionally organized.

The transfer times at the airport are kept extremely short thanks to well-coordinated processes. The direct transshipment from one aircraft to another is ensured without having to take the detour via the transit warehouse.

If required, the Lufthansa Cargo Charter Agency is also involved in the process. The shipment thus stays “under one roof” and can be shipped with just one air waybill and one invoicing channel. This reduces complexity and simplifies the processes. And a team in Frankfurt keeps an eye on the shipment during its entire transportation.

Since the end of 2011, Emergency.Solutions has been offered on a test basis by a number of German, European and North American stations – also on the Norwegian market. “Last year, we had about 120 assignments. In the medium term, we expect 300 to 400 cases per year,” says Harneid.

The reactions so far on the customer side have been extremely positive.

For this reason, the product has been officially offered worldwide since October 1, 2012. From Stavanger, urgent shipments are transported to the airport by truck, to reach the best connections.

“From there, they are flown by the next aircraft towards the destination, where the formalities are clarified in advance,” explains Harneid.
Up to now, the only possibility we often had in the case of heavy and large shipments was to organize a direct charter flight,” says ­Thormodsæter.

Lufthansa Cargo also – if necessary – falls back on charter flights in the framework of Emergency.Solutions. The charter segment is combined here with scheduled flights. That saves time and costs.

Norway-Singapore in three days.

In December, Kuehne + Nagel was commissioned to supply large parts to Singapore within three days for the repair of a special-purpose vessel heliport. With a length of over five meters and weighing 1,280 kilograms, short-term transportation from Stavanger would have no longer been possible. The shipowner would have had to pay high contractual penalties. By choosing Emergency.Solutions and thus the highest prioritization it was possible to organize a punctual delivery via Frankfurt.

“With Emergency.Solutions, the exception becomes the rule, but Lufthansa Cargo has defined clear procedures for this exception in advance. In this business, partners who have such flexible planning is exactly what we need,” says Thormodsæter. 

A special-purpose ship heads from the bay of Tananger towards the open North Sea, with a few seagulls flying overhead. At the same time, a drill head comes loose 8,000 kilometers away off the coast of West Africa: urgent case, spare part: Emergency.Solutions!

 

Emergency.Solutions at a glance.

  • Transport solution for the smallest spare part up to the biggest machine  Short-term availability, within a few hours if necessary
  • No weight limit – up to the maximum cargo capacity of the aircraft  
  • The highest priority, attention and reliability with personal service
  • Fastest airport-to-airport connections in Lufthansa Cargo’s global network – and beyond if necessary

Photos:

Moritz Schmid

planet 2/2014

Norway-Singapore in three days.

In December, Kuehne + Nagel was commissioned to supply large parts to Singapore within three days for the repair of a special-purpose vessel heliport. With a length of over five meters and weighing 1,280 kilograms, short-term transportation from Stavanger would have no longer been possible. The shipowner would have had to pay high contractual penalties. By choosing Emergency.Solutions and thus the highest prioritization it was possible to organize a punctual delivery via Frankfurt. 

“With Emergency.Solutions, the exception becomes the rule, but Lufthansa Cargo has defined clear procedures for this exception in advance. In this business, partners who have such flexible planning is exactly what we need,” says Thormodsæter. 

A special-purpose ship heads from the bay of Tananger towards the open North Sea, with a few seagulls flying overhead. At the same time, a drill head comes loose 8,000 kilometers away off the coast of West Africa: urgent case, spare part: Emergency.Solutions!

Emergency.Solutions at a glance.

  • Transport solution for the smallest spare part up to the biggest machine  Short-term availability, within a few hours if necessary
  • No weight limit – up to the maximum cargo capacity of the aircraft  
  • The highest priority, attention and reliability with personal service
  • Fastest airport-to-airport connections in Lufthansa Cargo’s global network – and beyond if necessary

 

Photos:

Moritz Schmid

planet 2/2014


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Oil is a mentality.

CEVA Logistics in Houston puts a special focus on the energy sector. Lufthansa Cargo helps it to reliably supply equipment to oil and gas companies worldwide.

If you’re trying to get a good share in the Houston market, you’d better talk service first and price second,” says Bruce Hulings, Vice President Energy Services from CEVA Logistics. That’s how the oil and gas industry had always worked here. Houston is the energy capital of the U.S. as well as one of the most important centers of the American economy: 28 of the country’s 500 biggest companies have their headquarters here – only New York has more.

And with a turnover of 6.8 billion euros, CEVA is also on the famous Fortune list. “Our customers include four of the six biggest oil and gas companies,” says Hulings. “On top of that, we supply to 400 of the world’s 700 oil platforms. The energy sector accounts for a total of six percent of our turnover.”

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The industry is still a strong growth driver for the U.S. economy. Lufthansa Cargo has also recognized the potential of the Texas capital and started services with AeroLogic to Houston Bush Intercontinental Airport in April this year.

An MD-11 connection was added in June. This market entry has had a very positive impact on the business of CEVA. “Now that Lufthansa Cargo also operates directly from Houston, we save time,” explains Bonnie Martin, Senior Logistics Manager. “Trucking to Dallas, for example, is no longer absolutely necessary.” And the time factor plays a tremendously important role. 

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“When you look at the size and the value of the cargo that is needed by the industry, it’s obvious that this cannot be kept in stock at the required destinations,” says Greg Weigel, Executive Vice President Global Airfreight at CEVA.

“If a customer says he has to have something within 24 hours at a certain location, it just has to be there at that point in time. Otherwise, his company could lose several hundreds of thousands of dollars a day.”

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Somewhat out-of-the-ordinary destinations are the special challenge here. As a rule, equipment for the oil and gas industry is not destined for the big hubs, but much more often for South America or West Africa.

“We need the reliability of Lufthansa Cargo that our freight is not only arriving punctually in Frankfurt, but that it also makes the connection on time to, for example, Ghana or Equatorial Guinea,” Weigel emphasizes.

Bruce Hulings adds: “We need a partner who lives the service idea, who listens and always tries to make everything possible. The oil business is a mentality. It’s not as if I’m going into a store to buy some jeans, and, if they don’t happen to be in stock, I simply come back next week. Lufthansa Cargo and CEVA share the same principles of service and excellence – all over the world.”   

CEVA Logistics in figures.

Turnover: 6.8 billion euros (2010)

Employees: over 46,000

Logistics service provider ranking: Number 4 (worldwide)

Ranking IATA: Number 6 (worldwide)

Business locations: 1,200 in over 170 countries

Warehousing capacity: 10 million square meters

 

Photos:

Bruce Benett

planet 2/2011

CEVA Logistics in figures.

Turnover: 6.8 billion euros (2010)
Employees: over 46,000
Logistics service provider ranking: Number 4 (worldwide)
Ranking IATA:  Number 6 (worldwide)
Business locations:  1,200 in over 170 countries
Warehousing capacity:  10 million square meters

 

Photos:

Bruce Benett

planet 2/2011


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Connecting flexibility and quality.

Statements by Stephan Haltmayer, Managing Director of QCS-Quick Cargo Service.

Excellent teamwork: Stephan Haltmayer (l.), Managing Director of QCS-Quick Cargo Service, and his Lufthansa Cargo sales contact Christopher Biaesch always look for the direct line of communication to keep their customers satisfied.

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Airport Frankfurt am Main, apron, March 2, 11.30 a.m. Stephan Haltmayer is the epitome of composure. His flight to Bangkok is departing in a good three hours. The Managing Director of QCS-Quick Cargo Service will be meeting important Asian partners and customers there at a regional logistics conference. Three days later, the head of the mid-sized forwarding company from Mörfelden near Frankfurt will travel on to São Paulo – for sales talks. “I still have to pack my bags,” Haltmayer remarks with a smile, pretty relaxed despite the tight schedule.

Before setting off, he takes the time, together with Christopher Biaesch, his sales contact at Lufthansa Cargo, to answer the questions of the planet reporter team on the subject of quality and to accompany it to the freighter to Shanghai on the apron for photos showing a QCS shipment. “In our industry, quality is always connected with keeping your cool when the pace gets hectic,” says Haltmeyer.

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The forwarder is a good discussion partner when it comes to quality in the airfreight industry. His company won the Lufthansa Cargo Quality Award in 2011. “The airfreight business is rapid-moving and requires a lot of flexibility,” Haltmeyer points out. “But if you don’t have people who work precisely, all the speed is worth nothing.”

The achievement of the award by QCS was primarily attributable to its excellent supply quality. More specifically: QCS almost always complied with the exact delivery quantities notified and always made its shipments including the required documents available punctually. Lufthansa Cargo’s decision to launch the Quality Award was by no means selfless: “Our analyses revealed that our own quality depends to about 30 percent on the preliminary performance of the forwarders,” says Lufthansa Cargo Key Account Manager Christopher Biaesch.

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The quality of the airline is continuously monitored, with the “Notification for Delivery” indicator (NFD). To ensure that Lufthansa Cargo can be the quality leader here, the airline requires clear booking data from the forwarders at an early a stage as possible, no “no-shows” (these are shipments that are booked but then not delivered) and compliance with the IATA criterion “ready for carriage”. This is the case when cargo and documents have been properly delivered to the airline – a precondition for the ability to reliably carry out airport-to-airport transportation at all.

“Good processes are the prerequisite for good quality,” Stephan Haltmayer confirms. “This applies at Lufthansa Cargo and in our company too. But the human factor is also decisive for success. The Quality Award was primarily won by our employees with their know-how and their commitment.”

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QCS is one of the ten biggest owner-operated IATA forwarders in Germany. The company has made a name for itself as a reliable logistics service provider for mid-sized firms in the export industry. Mechanical engineering companies, automotive suppliers and steel, pharmaceutical and chemical firms are on the list of customers. “Mid-sized firms like working together with mid-sized firms,” says Haltmayer.

“The employees here also think entrepreneurially.” Under no circumstances does he intend becoming dependent on individual key account customers.QCS is one of the ten biggest owner-operated IATA forwarders in Germany. The company has made a name for itself as a reliable logistics service provider for mid-sized firms in the export industry. Mechanical engineering companies, automotive suppliers and steel, pharmaceutical and chemical firms are on the list of customers. “Mid-sized firms like working together with mid-sized firms,” says Haltmayer. “The employees here also think entrepreneurially.” Under no circumstances does he intend becoming dependent on individual key account customers.

QCS is represented with its own branch offices at all major German airport locations.

Globally, it cooperates with other locally based, mid-sized forwarders. One important recipe for success here: “We only work together with hand-picked, financially sound partners, whom we know personally and whom our customers can trust,” says Stephan Haltmayer. “This is an integral part of our quality philosophy.”

The processes of the network are discussed locally on a monthly basis.

For this reason alone, Haltmayer and his management team have to travel a lot. The meetings, however, also turn their attention to customer acquisition. After all, the consignees are often enough the ones who have to pay for the transport and logistics services and who are thus also allowed to choose the service provider.

This also extends to the choice of carrier. “In many cases, we recommend Lufthansa Cargo,” says Haltmayer. “With its strong network, there are reliable high-frequency connections out of Germany to all markets that are important for us.” These include in particular India, the U.S., and, more recently again, Brazil. “China, of course, is also important, although a slower growth has been recently confirmed here due to the increasingly strong currency and rising labor costs.”
    
Haltmayer also sees Lufthansa Cargo ahead of the competition with respect to eBooking and “troubleshooting”. “There you have it again, the combination of intelligent processes and personal commitment,” he says.

“Our employees have the carer gene.”

“We need partners on the airline side who adopt exactly the same approach.” Underlining the point, he pats Christopher Biaesch on the shoulder. “We don’t settle for half-measures,” he says self-confidently. “A little extra effort is sometimes also needed.”

For example, when QCS had to organize the transportation of the crown jewels of the last Russian tsar from St. Petersburg to an exhibition in Miami. Or when, on one Friday evening, an extremely heavy spare part for a manufacturing robot had to be shipped at the last minute to an automobile plant in Mexico. “It initially looked as if the aircraft was overbooked. 

But we then managed to find a solution. On Sunday, the job had been completed,” Biaesch recalls. “The most important thing was that we were constantly in close contact,” Haltmayer adds. “Practically every hour, the customer gave us a call, and we were able to tell him every time with a clear conscience that everything was going to work out fine.”

The pressure on this assignment was enormous, as there was a risk of an assembly line standstill. Haltmayer was nevertheless able to maintain his typical calmness. “I knew that Lufthansa Cargo would not get hectic, but that it would manage the job professionally right to the end.”

QCS is represented with its own branch offices at all major German airport locations.

Globally, it cooperates with other locally based, mid-sized forwarders. One important recipe for success here: “We only work together with hand-picked, financially sound partners, whom we know personally and whom our customers can trust,” says Stephan Haltmayer. “This is an integral part of our quality philosophy.”

The processes of the network are discussed locally on a monthly basis.

For this reason alone, Haltmayer and his management team have to travel a lot. The meetings, however, also turn their attention to customer acquisition. After all, the consignees are often enough the ones who have to pay for the transport and logistics services and who are thus also allowed to choose the service provider.

This also extends to the choice of carrier. “In many cases, we recommend Lufthansa Cargo,” says Haltmayer. “With its strong network, there are reliable high-frequency connections out of Germany to all markets that are important for us.” These include in particular India, the U.S., and, more recently again, Brazil. “China, of course, is also important, although a slower growth has been recently confirmed here due to the increasingly strong currency and rising labor costs.”

Haltmayer also sees Lufthansa Cargo ahead of the competition with respect to eBooking and “troubleshooting”. “There you have it again, the combination of intelligent processes and personal commitment,” he says.

“Our employees have the carer gene.

“We need partners on the airline side who adopt exactly the same approach.” Underlining the point, he pats Christopher Biaesch on the shoulder. “We don’t settle for half-measures,” he says self-confidently. “A little extra effort is sometimes also needed.”

For example, when QCS had to organize the transportation of the crown jewels of the last Russian tsar from St. Petersburg to an exhibition in Miami. Or when, on one Friday evening, an extremely heavy spare part for a manufacturing robot had to be shipped at the last minute to an automobile plant in Mexico. 

“It initially looked as if the aircraft was overbooked. But we then managed to find a solution. On Sunday, the job had been completed,” Biaesch recalls. “The most important thing was that we were constantly in close contact,” Haltmayer adds. “Practically every hour, the customer gave us a call, and we were able to tell him every time with a clear conscience that everything was going to work out fine.”

The pressure on this assignment was enormous, as there was a risk of an assembly line standstill. Haltmayer was nevertheless able to maintain his typical calmness. “I knew that Lufthansa Cargo would not get hectic, but that it would manage the job professionally right to the end.”

 

5 questions to Stephan Haltmayer.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Our employees are the basis of the success of QCS. They pursue the same goals as the company management. Apart from that, our motto is: quality instead of quantity!

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
An airline needs a modern infrastructure, a large route network and good customer service. Lufthansa Cargo has all that, they are the trendsetter in the cargo market.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
My Porsche, mid-sized firms and Germany.
    
What does quality of life mean for you?
To spend time meaningfully. This explicitly includes the ­occasional glass of good red wine by the fireside.

What are your own personal qualities? 
always seek to improve myself and to move in new directions. In my view, success has a long-term character. Endurance and optimism are just as much among my qualities as my willingness to take risks, without which you cannot move forward.

5 questions to Stephan Haltmayer.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Our employees are the basis of the success of QCS. They pursue the same goals as the company management. Apart from that, our motto is: quality instead of quantity!

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
An airline needs a modern infrastructure, a large route network and good customer service. Lufthansa Cargo has all that, they are the trendsetter in the cargo market.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
My Porsche, mid-sized firms and Germany.

What does quality of life mean for you?
To spend time meaningfully. This explicitly includes the ­occasional glass of good red wine by the fireside.

What are your own personal qualities? 
always seek to improve myself and to move in new directions. In my view, success has a long-term character. Endurance and optimism are just as much among my qualities as my willingness to take risks, without which you cannot move forward.

 

5 questions to Christopher Biaesch.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Whether for safety, performance, customer satisfaction, product diversification or investments in the workforce and in the infrastructure – we step up the pace in all fields.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
The quality of an airline is measurable and perceptible. In general, what counts is not to settle for half-measures and to always strive for 100 percent.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
The driving style of Sebastian Vettel. He explores the limits, but rarely moves beyond them. He has my greatest respect!

What does quality of life mean for you?
A healthy work-life balance, a good twelve-kilometer run along the River Main, true friends, a strong coffee in the morning.

What are your own personal qualities? 
I am optimistic, like life and hope that others notice that!

Photos:

Volker Römer, Ralf Kreuels

planet 1/2012

5 questions to Christopher Biaesch.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Whether for safety, performance, customer satisfaction, product diversification or investments in the workforce and in the infrastructure – we step up the pace in all fields.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
The quality of an airline is measurable and perceptible. In general, what counts is not to settle for half-measures and to always strive for 100 percent.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
The driving style of Sebastian Vettel. He explores the limits, but rarely moves beyond them. He has my greatest respect!

What does quality of life mean for you?
A healthy work-life balance, a good twelve-kilometer run along the River Main, true friends, a strong coffee in the morning.

What are your own personal qualities? 
I am optimistic, like life and hope that others notice that!

 

Photos:

Volker Römer, Ralf Kreuels

planet 1/2012


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Quick handled.

Daniele Fregnan, Head of Logistics at Benetton, on quality in the air cargo business.

“At Benetton, the quality of the processes must match the quality of the garments,” says Daniele Fregnan (l.), Head of Logistics at Benetton. Antonio Dinis Queiros, Manager Northeast Italy at Lufthansa Cargo, Venice, knows how to ensure this: “For us, transparency and process optimization are a standing order.”

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Marco Polo Airport, Venice, March 7, 7.30 a.m. LH326 from Frankfurt glides over the lagoon city. The Airbus A321 touches down gently on the runway. On board: over 150 passengers. In the cargo hold: finest-quality garments. Soft pullovers, light summer dresses, suits, robust jeans and colorful childrenswear – the new Benetton collection 2012, partially manufactured in Asia and flown in via Frankfurt. The plane has hardly landed when the handling process begins. The goods are swiftly loaded onto trucks to be transported to the central warehouse in Castrette 30 kilometers away – one of the three hubs worldwide.

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Three hours later, the pallets are taken to the huge warehousing complex by the trucks that stand patiently in the glistening sunlight. Inside the facility: hectic activities. A fully automated sorting system allocates the suits, dresses and pullovers to cardboard boxes and sends them on their way. Whirring conveyor belts transport the receptacles with their marked destinations and contents through an underground tunnel 1.1 kilometers long to the distribution center.

Here too, there is state-of-the-art warehousing high-tech: on 30,000 square meters, sorting slides move rapidly to and fro between rack systems as if controlled by some invisible hand. The racks tower up several stories high. Boxes are grabbed, pushed into apertures or onto the next belts.

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“The majority of goods manufactured by Benetton arrive in Castrette, and we send them from the distribution center to 6,400 stores worldwide,” explains Daniele Fregnan, Head of Logistics. The Italian is in charge of the entire Benetton logistics and also responsible for the company’s own forwarding company Benind, which cooperates with various subcontractors. “I’ve been working for Benetton for many years.

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After interruptions, I’ve always returned. For me, Benetton is an expression of success, harmony and progress.”

The Italian family-run company began its success story 45 years ago when it opened its first own factory. Today, the Benetton Group is represented worldwide in 120 countries and operates the brands United Colors of Benetton, Undercolors of Benetton, Sisley and Playlife in the clothing sector. “Benetton has been facing a lot of competition during recent years. We have mainly set ourselves apart through the quality of our garments, both as regards design and material,” explains Fregnan.

“This quality, however, must also be matched by the quality of the logistical process!” The distribution inside Italy takes one to two days, and between three and five days are estimated for all other destinations. 85 percent of the goods in interim storage in Castrette reach their destination by land. Fregnan: “Our aim is flawless, fast and punctual delivery. This is my challenge. But also my own personal goal.”

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Benetton only transports about three percent of its entire volume of goods as airfreight. In the field of exports from Italy, however, this is nonetheless about 2,300 tons per year. The most important destinations are New York, Tokyo, Mexico City, Taipei, Bogotá and Miami. Lufthansa Cargo flies approximately 27 percent of the airfreight volume. “Benetton is therefore our biggest customer in this region,” says Antonio Dinis Queiros. The Manager Northeast Italy at Lufthansa Cargo in Venice is responsible for the region and has been working for the company with the crane as its logo for 24 years. 

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“The collaboration with Benetton is correspondingly close,” says the man born in Portugal. “We are constantly optimizing the processes and have developed a very transparent business relationship.”

Benetton’s Head of Logistics Fregnan also appreciates the value of this collaboration: “The traditional attitude of many Italians when it comes to punctuality does not fit in particularly well with the requirements of the logistics industry,” he says with a smile and adds: “What Lufthansa offers here in the way of service and reliability is not only excellent, but also indispensable for Benetton’s quality claim.”

Despite the already highly developed and sophisticated distribution process at Benetton, however, there are new ideas.
    
In future, a number of goods movements will no longer take place via the big central warehouse in Venice. “We can shorten the distances at many points,” says Fregnan.

As 50 percent of the goods are manufactured in Asia, 30 percent in Tunisia and 20 percent in Eastern Europe, he feels that there are many possibilities for direct links to the sales destinations.

Fregnan: “It’s a good thing to have established a reliable quality standard, but this process must never end.”

Benetton’s Head of Logistics Fregnan also appreciates the value of this collaboration: “The traditional attitude of many Italians when it comes to punctuality does not fit in particularly well with the requirements of the logistics industry,” he says with a smile and adds: “What Lufthansa offers here in the way of service and reliability is not only excellent, but also indispensable for Benetton’s quality claim.”

Despite the already highly developed and sophisticated distribution process at Benetton, however, there are new ideas.

In future, a number of goods movements will no longer take place via the big central warehouse in Venice. “We can shorten the distances at many points,” says Fregnan.

As 50 percent of the goods are manufactured in Asia, 30 percent in Tunisia and 20 percent in Eastern Europe, he feels that there are many possibilities for direct links to the sales destinations.

Fregnan: “It’s a good thing to have established a reliable quality standard, but this process must never end.”

 

5 questions to Daniele Fregnan.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
At Benetton you can breathe. There is an atmosphere of creativity, ingenuity and passion for art. The fact that I have returned to this wonderful company for the third time has nothing to do with money.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
Genuine willingness to provide services including tracking & tracing and pro-active information.
    
Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
Lufthansa’s Senator Lounge. In general, quality for me is when I buy something – whether a product or a service – and the provider has already understood my requirements before I have explained them

What does quality of life mean for you?
To have time for my wife and my daughter, doing sport, listening to music.

What are your own personal qualities? 
Predictability and reliability.

5 questions to Daniele Fregnan.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
At Benetton you can breathe. There is an atmosphere of creativity, ingenuity and passion for art. The fact that I have returned to this wonderful company for the third time has nothing to do with money.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
Genuine willingness to provide services including tracking & tracing and pro-active information.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
Lufthansa’s Senator Lounge. In general, quality for me is when I buy something – whether a product or a service – and the provider has already understood my requirements before I have explained them

What does quality of life mean for you?
To have time for my wife and my daughter, doing sport, listening to music.

What are your own personal qualities? 
Predictability and reliability.

 

5 questions to Antonio Dinis Queiros.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Reliability and customer orientation as well as a broad product portfolio.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
The ability to meet customer expectations. The service must correspond to what the customer has paid.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
A good pair of designer shoes, a delicious cheese from the mountains of my native country Portugal or a Ferrari sports car.
    
What does quality of life mean for you?
To be able to free myself mentally from my work when I need time for myself and for those I love.

What are your own personal qualities? 
Powers of assertion, enthusiasm and dedication.

Photos:

Volker Römers, Ralf Kreuels

planet 1/2012

5 questions to Antonio Dinis Queiros.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Reliability and customer orientation as well as a broad product portfolio.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
The ability to meet customer expectations. The service must correspond to what the customer has paid.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
A good pair of designer shoes, a delicious cheese from the mountains of my native country Portugal or a Ferrari sports car.

What does quality of life mean for you?
To be able to free myself mentally from my work when I need time for myself and for those I love.

What are your own personal qualities? 
Powers of assertion, enthusiasm and dedication.

 

Photos:

Volker Römer, Ralf Kreuels

planet 1/2012


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From –20°C to +30°C.

With the service “Cool/td-Active”, Lufthansa Cargo offers temperature-controlled transport from consignor to consignee. The cool & heat containers called “Unicoolers” are a key to the success of Lufthansa Cargo’s Competence Center Temperature Control (CCTC). They carry, for example, urgently required vaccines for swift transportation to Washington. Or to destinations all over the world. The phone lines in Marburg are buzzing. It is the vaccination season in the northern hemisphere, and hospitals and doctors have to cope with a rising tide of patients. On this Friday afternoon, an unusually large number of customers from the U.S. are ringing up the pharmaceutical company, which manufactures certain sera in Marburg only. For destinations worldwide.

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The reaction is swift: the house forwarder is commissioned to organize an urgently required transportation to Washington. Lufthansa Cargo’s capacities there are checked straight away. The green light is given! For the appropriate transport receptacle for the highly sensitive cargo, too: vaccines must be transported at between two and eight degrees Celsius to ensure that they remain fit for use. This solution has a name: Cool/td-Active, the Lufthansa Cargo service for temperature-controlled transport.

The driver from the forwarding company gets into his truck at about 6 p.m. to pick up four Unicoolers – purpose-built cool & heat containers – at Lufthansa Cargo’s Competence Center Temperature Control (CCTC) at Frankfurt Airport. Two hours later, he is loading the high-tech containers with the vaccine in Marburg.

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The journey continues next morning: at 6 a.m. the truck with the Unicoolers passes through the security gate and drops them off at Lufthansa Cargo’s Perishables Center. The team led by Karin Krestan, Senior Handling Manager at the CCTC, takes on the sensitive cargo. “We ensure that the shipments are handled as carefully and as swiftly as possible prior to take-off in compliance with temperature control provisions,” Krestan explains. “Furthermore, we keep an eye on every single transport operation from the booking through to the final delivery.”

The Boeing 747 with the flight number LH 418 takes off on schedule at 1 p.m. at Frankfurt Airport and lands at 3.50 p.m. at Dulles International Airport in Washington. A short while later, the forwarder begins with the distribution of the vaccine – for the benefit of the patients.

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In addition to the care exercised by the handling team, the cool & heat containers play a key role in the standardized process of Cool/td-Active. Lufthansa Cargo makes more than 240 of these purpose-built containers available to its customers. And the number is growing by the month. The intelligent receptacles come in two sizes: the version RAP has room for up to five euro-pallets, the RKN for one. As a rule, the goods are stowed in the container by the customers themselves and then taken to the airport in a thermo truck. Provided this is allowed by country-specific regulations, forwarders also transport the shipment at the receiving point along with the container to the customer to ensure seamless temperature control.

The temperature inside the containers can be set at values between -20 and +30 degrees Celsius. With the help of an autonomous cooling and heating system, the containers are, to a large extent, able to maintain a constant temperature – irrespective of whether heat or frost prevails outside. Lufthansa Cargo’s goal is a deviation of no more than plus/minus three degrees Celsius from the defined temperature. The temperature usually fluctuates by less than one degree – that’s how fine-tuned cooling and heating operate.

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Sometimes the containers have to work really hard on a single journey. “For example, when they take off in winter in Chicago at -15 degrees for delivery in Dubai, where the temperature is +40 degrees,” explains Hans-Peter Justus, Senior Product Manager for Cool/td at the CCTC. “Such extreme outside temperature ranges are no problem for our cool & heat containers – as long as their accumulators are well-charged and the desired degree value has been properly set.” For this reason, Lufthansa Cargo employees recheck the container’s correct programming prior to take-off.

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As a rule, primary pharmaceutical products, sera or advanced cancer-fighting drugs tolerate only very slight fluctuations in temperature. Otherwise their molecular structure changes and they become unfit for use. A great responsibility, which all persons involved are aware of.

“We not only have a professional commitment to do our job as optimally as possible, but a moral one too,” says Christopher Dehio, Senior Key Account Manager at the CCTC. “Every person who goes to the doctor and is given a medicine should be able to rely on its first-class quality.”

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Continuous temperature logging Accordingly, there is strict monitoring of the shipments: in addition to the manufacturers themselves, who continuously record the temperature of their goods with data loggers, Lufthansa Cargo’s cool & heat container also permanently documents its inside temperature.

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This is an important documentation of quality for the pharmaceutical manufacturers, which government institutions in the recipient markets are also demanding more and more frequently. Temperature is one key aspect, speed is another.

The colleagues from Fraport, who lose no time and take on the transportation of the Unicoolers to the aircraft, know this too. About a third of all cool & heat containers are transported in Lufthansa Cargo freighters, with two-thirds flying in Lufthansa’s wide-body aircraft. These are large passenger aircraft, such as the Airbus A340 the Boeing 747, and soon the A380 too, which depart from Frankfurt or Munich to destinations all over the world.

Lufthansa Cargo has equipped 89 stations to handle cool & heat containers. And the number of such stations is steadily rising. Trained personnel must be at the ready at both ends of the transport chain. They take care of dry ice for the cooling, electric sockets for the recharging of the containers as well as generally accelerating processes. No other carrier offers such a competent and global network. Even the pilots are informed about what exactly is in their cargo holds, thus ensuring that not only the passengers but also the cargo shipments arrive safely. Cool/td-Active, therefore, is not only of interest to the pharmaceutical industry, but also to other economic sectors. In the meantime, for example, temperature-sensitive high-tech devices as well as valuable chemicals, lacquers or resins are sent on their way in the cool & heat containers.

Lufthansa Cargo has equipped 89 stations to handle cool & heat containers. And the number of such stations is steadily rising. Trained personnel must be at the ready at both ends of the transport chain. They take care of dry ice for the cooling, electric sockets for the recharging of the containers as well as generally accelerating processes. No other carrier offers such a competent and global network. Even the pilots are informed about what exactly is in their cargo holds, thus ensuring that not only the passengers but also the cargo shipments arrive safely.

All of them could not be transported with cooling alone. Some adhesives that are used, for example, for joining engineering in the aircraft industry, for example, are only allowed to be transported between +20 and +28 degrees Celsius, otherwise they start to set.

Refrigerated airfreight transport has existed ever since decommissioned DC3s flew ice-chilled freshly caught tuna fish from the South Pacific to California after the second world war.

Flying airfreight shipments for sophisticated industrial customers within tight temperature ranges, on the other hand, is new ground. With Cool/td-Active, Lufthansa Cargo operates confidently on this terrain. And it also offers forwarders and industry new possibilities of organizing their worldwide supply chains for particularly temperature-sensitive goods.

www.lufthansa-cargo.com

Whether external temperature, internal temperature, humidity, battery status or door functionalities – a system of sensors fitted into the cool & heat containers continuously logs all data relevant for the quality of temperature control throughout the entire transportation.

Sophisticated technology enables, in accordance with presets, a by and large constant temperature level inside the Lufthansa Cargo cool & heat containers. Dry ice carried with the container and an electronic heating system work hand in hand here.

Lufthansa Cargo’s goal is a deviation of no more than plus/minus three degrees from the preset temperature.

Specially prepared programs guarantee easy and fast use of the containers: program 1 is suitable for goods that have to be transported between +2 and +8 degrees Celsius. The mean value set here is +5 degrees Celsius. Program 2 was developed for goods that require a temperature of +15 to +25 degrees Celsius during transportation. The mean value is also set here, at +20 degrees. Finally, program 3 enables a variable temperature of -20 degrees to +30 degrees Celsius.

The scheduling and allocation of Lufthansa Cargo’s 240 cool & heat containers calls for flexibility, as the 120 RKNs and 120 RAPs are in great demand by the pharmaceutical and high-tech industry. In collaboration with a team of specialists from Sharjah, the Product Management Team of the Competence Center Temperature Control (CCTC) reliability schedules and allocates the popular boxes for customers all over the world.

All of them could not be transported with cooling alone. Some adhesives that are used, for example, for joining engineering in the aircraft industry, for example, are only allowed to be transported between +20 and +28 degrees Celsius, otherwise they start to set.

Refrigerated airfreight transport has existed ever since decommissioned DC3s flew ice-chilled freshly caught tuna fish from the South Pacific to California after the second world war. Flying airfreight shipments for sophisticated industrial customers within tight temperature ranges, on the other hand, is new ground. With Cool/td-Active, Lufthansa Cargo operates confidently on this terrain. And it also offers forwarders and industry new possibilities of organizing their worldwide supply chains for particularly temperature-sensitive goods.

www.lufthansa-cargo.com

Whether external temperature, internal temperature, humidity, battery status or door functionalities – a system of sensors fitted into the cool & heat containers continuously logs all data relevant for the quality of temperature control throughout the entire transportation.

Sophisticated technology enables, in accordance with presets, a by and large constant temperature level inside the Lufthansa Cargo cool & heat containers. Dry ice carried with the container and an electronic heating system work hand in hand here.

Lufthansa Cargo’s goal is a deviation of no more than plus/minus three degrees from the preset temperature.

Specially prepared programs guarantee easy and fast use of the containers: program 1 is suitable for goods that have to be transported between +2 and +8 degrees Celsius. The mean value set here is +5 degrees Celsius. Program 2 was developed for goods that require a temperature of +15 to +25 degrees Celsius during transportation. The mean value is also set here, at +20 degrees. Finally, program 3 enables a variable temperature of -20 degrees to +30 degrees Celsius.

The scheduling and allocation of Lufthansa Cargo’s 240 cool & heat containers calls for flexibility, as the 120 RKNs and 120 RAPs are in great demand by the pharmaceutical and high-tech industry. In collaboration with a team of specialists from Sharjah, the Product Management Team of the Competence Center Temperature Control (CCTC) reliability schedules and allocates the popular boxes for customers all over the world.

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“The network is alive!”

Interview with Gabie Hartmann, Consultant Global Cool Container System, Product Management for Cool/td, at Lufthansa Cargo’s Competence Center Temperature Control (CCTC).

What is your task at the CCTC?

Gabie Hartmann: I manage acute network issues and to make sure enough containers are in stock at the locations at which the customers require them at any particular time. I am supported here by a team of Lufthansa Cargo specialists that is based in Sharjah and that coordinates from there the turnaround of all Cool/td-Active containers. All orders are made via the desert metropolis. Eight employees schedule and allocate the 240 cool & heat containers and the more than 4,000 cool-only containers that are in global use for the service Cool/td-Active.

What happens to the containers once they have arrived at the airport of destination?

Gabie Hartmann: Provided this is allowed by country-specific regulations, we also make them available to our customers beyond the airport. To enable an unbroken cool chain from the consignor to the consignee, the time of container return is important. As a rule, the customers rent a container for four days or 96 hours. The 96-hour rule has the advantage for the customers that the hire period is not shortened by time zones – which is important, for example, for transportation from the U.S. to Asia. But longer hire periods are also possible. If the containers are overdue at the agreed return time, the ULD Management in Sharjah informs us about it and additional charges are made. At some stations, we have a so-called container stock for certain shippers. This way, we offset possible irregularities in container turnaround and minimize supply bottlenecks for the customer. This system also enables us to cater for short-term capacity peaks.

You are reputed to almost always know exactly where every single one of the 240 cool & heat containers is anywhere in the world...

Gabie Hartmann: Yes correct, that is true. The containers are in tremendous demand on the customer side. It’s normal, therefore, that you simply make a mental note of their current whereabouts. What I enjoy most is seeing how the required number of containers gets to the right place at the right time. If a flight from FRA is delayed, for example, then I check whether I can make the containers available via Munich. I must always draw up new routes. What is more, the traffic flows for transportation are extremely imbalanced. In other words: of four cool & heat containers shipped to destination A, at most one, if at all, returns a short while later filled with refrigerated cargo. For the turnaround planning and the container logistics, this is one of the most exciting challenges.

Lufthansa Cargo has currently equipped 89 stations to handle cool & heat containers. When will the figure of 100 be reached?

Gabie Hartmann: Maybe this year already – the network is alive! The sales people and Lufthansa Cargo’s key account managers communicate the industry’s requirements to the Product Management team. The network of Lufthansa and Lufthansa Cargo constantly adapts to the overall demand, the number of aircraft deployed can change very quickly, and a flight destination may sometimes be deleted from the flight timetable in favor of a completely different one. We must to be prepared for this.

Photos:

Matthias Just

planet 1/2010

What is your task at the CCTC?
Gabie Hartmann: I manage acute network issues and to make sure enough containers are in stock at the locations at which the customers require them at any particular time. I am supported here by a team of Lufthansa Cargo specialists that is based in Sharjah and that coordinates from there the turnaround of all Cool/td-Active containers. All orders are made via the desert metropolis. Eight employees schedule and allocate the 240 cool & heat containers and the more than 4,000 cool-only containers that are in global use for the service Cool/td-Active.

What happens to the containers once they have arrived at the airport of destination? 
Gabie Hartmann: Provided this is allowed by country-specific regulations, we also make them available to our customers beyond the airport. To enable an unbroken cool chain from the consignor to the consignee, the time of container return is important. As a rule, the customers rent a container for four days or 96 hours. The 96-hour rule has the advantage for the customers that the hire period is not shortened by time zones – which is important, for example, for transportation from the U.S. to Asia. But longer hire periods are also possible. If the containers are overdue at the agreed return time, the ULD Management in Sharjah informs us about it and additional charges are made. At some stations, we have a so-called container stock for certain shippers. This way, we offset possible irregularities in container turnaround and minimize supply bottlenecks for the customer. This system also enables us to cater for short-term capacity peaks.

You are reputed to almost always know exactly where every single one of the 240 cool & heat containers is anywhere in the world...
Gabie Hartmann: Yes correct, that is true. The containers are in tremendous demand on the customer side. It’s normal, therefore, that you simply make a mental note of their current whereabouts. What I enjoy most is seeing how the required number of containers gets to the right place at the right time. If a flight from FRA is delayed, for example, then I check whether I can make the containers available via Munich. I must always draw up new routes. What is more, the traffic flows for transportation are extremely imbalanced. In other words: of four cool & heat containers shipped to destination A, at most one, if at all, returns a short while later filled with refrigerated cargo. For the turnaround planning and the container logistics, this is one of the most exciting challenges.

Lufthansa Cargo has currently equipped 89 stations to handle cool & heat containers. When will the figure of 100 be reached?
Gabie Hartmann: Maybe this year already – the network is alive! The sales people and Lufthansa Cargo’s key account managers communicate the industry’s requirements to the Product Management team. The network of Lufthansa and Lufthansa Cargo constantly adapts to the overall demand, the number of aircraft deployed can change very quickly, and a flight destination may sometimes be deleted from the flight timetable in favor of a completely different one. We must to be prepared for this.

 

Photos:

Matthias Just

planet 1/2010


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Quality counts.

Perishalbes for Europe by Venus International Transport from Egypt.

International Airport Cairo, March 8, 1 p.m. The MD-11 freighter from Lufthansa Cargo has arrived punctually. The cargo for the onward flight to Sharjah and from there back to Frankfurt is already standing on the apron: two pallets of fresh lettuce from Alexandria for a customer in Saudi Arabia and a total of seven containers of hanging garments for Harrods in London.

The handling staff is working quickly and precisely. The MD-11 is unloaded: mainly pharmaceuticals and chemical products, equipment for oil drilling companies and high-quality industrial goods are imported to Egypt as airfreight. Then the lettuce and garments go on board – the freighter is airborne again after just one-and-a-half hours on the ground.

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“It is this perfectly functioning system and the commitment to the business that I rate most highly about Lufthansa Cargo,” says Samia El Sayed. “For me, this means quality.” She has responsibility for the entire cargo that has just been loaded into the MD-11 at Cairo. Samia El Sayed founded her company Venus International Transport 26 years ago.

Today, Venus is Egypt’s leading airfreight forwarder, with an annual export volume of 40,000 to 45,000 tons and over 60 employees. At the company’s inception, Samia El Sayed was a pioneer in the airfreight industry organized on a private enterprise basis. Venus is still the only Egyptian player that charters freighters itself. Fresh fruit and vegetables, mainly for the European market, account for 85 percent of the turnover.

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“Only one thing counts in this business and that’s quality,” says Samia El Sayed. The freshness of the goods is the decisive sales argument for most agricultural products from Egypt – whether it’s strawberries, grapes, green beans, peppers, spring onions or cherry tomatoes. “The refrigeration chain must not be interrupted at any point, and, above all, everything has to move fast,” the businesswoman stresses.

In the most important markets in the Netherlands, France, the UK and Germany, Egyptian fruit and vegetables are only competitive vis-à-vis European produce for a short time due to the higher transportation costs. The season lasts from the pre-Christmas period to the beginning of June at the longest.

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For Lufthansa Cargo too, quality is the decisive sales criterion in Egypt. “We have a highly efficient team of eleven committed and excellently qualified employees here,” says Dieter Olker. Since October 2011, he has been General Manager for North and Northeast Africa. “Our customers know that we deliver quality, that we master our processes and that we bring along the necessary know-how. And we can be contacted 24 hours a day.”

Network flexibility and adjustment to the requirements of the sensitive perishables business are also advantages. “In December and January, we routed 14 freighters via Cairo in order to meet the demand, above all, for strawberries and green beans,” says Olker. High specialization, he adds, is a further unique selling proposition.

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“Live animals, for example, or valuable cargo – we’re the only ones who can do that in Cairo.”

For Lufthansa Cargo, Venus International Transport is by far the most important customer in Egypt. And the two companies are united by a shared success story, which began with a quality leap. “Right from the start, I dreamed of a cold storage warehouse, and I also told everybody about my dream,” Samia El Sayed recalls. “After hearing about this, the Lufthansa man responsible in Cairo obtained a visa for Germany for me within two days and showed me the Perishables Center in Frankfurt. It then took me another five years trying hard to persuade trade associations and government authorities before we had finally also built a cold storage warehouse at Cairo Airport.”

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Every type of fruit and vegetable requires its own temperature between zero and ten degrees Celsius. “Green beans in particular are very sensitive,” explains Samia El Sayed. “The quality deteriorates considerably within just a few days. They are the only vegetable that is still impossible to transport as sea freight.” With Lufthansa Cargo, she knows that her sensitive freight is in good hands. “The people there always keep an eye on careful handling, and they check the goods that have been delivered by refrigerated trucks at the airport. What is more, I know for sure: Lufthansa Cargo is punctual!”

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For Lufthansa Cargo, however, there are already indications of a slight recovery. In addition to the two weekly freighter flights via Sharjah, Lufthansa Cargo has started to operate a scheduled freighter directly to Frankfurt on Mondays, Lufthansa passenger aircraft have again been flying to Frankfurt twice daily since March, and there are four weekly flights to Munich plus capacities of Austrian Airlines. For Dieter Olker the matter is clear: “In times of crisis there is only one maxim: Build unquestioningly on quality.”

5 questions to Samia El Sayed.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
A distinctive sense of responsibility and the dedication to what we do. And a strong woman!

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
When difficulties occur, the airline must find a solution. The system at Lufthansa Cargo is thoroughly professional and the attitude of the people there is always positive.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
A Mercedes! I drive one myself. In addition, I love the perfection of classic Egyptian music.
    
What does quality of life mean for you?
To love people. To see a family grow. Being willing to always learn. Spirituality. And, in particular as an entrepreneur, to be aware of one’s responsibility to society.

What are your own personal qualities? 
I am a responsible, emotional, tolerant and dedicated person. It is my conviction that there is no humanity without giving to others and helping.

5 questions to Samia El Sayed.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
A distinctive sense of responsibility and the dedication to what we do. And a strong woman!

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
When difficulties occur, the airline must find a solution. The system at Lufthansa Cargo is thoroughly professional and the attitude of the people there is always positive.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
A Mercedes! I drive one myself. In addition, I love the perfection of classic Egyptian music.

What does quality of life mean for you?
To love people. To see a family grow. Being willing to always learn. Spirituality. And, in particular as an entrepreneur, to be aware of one’s responsibility to society.

What are your own personal qualities? 
I am a responsible, emotional, tolerant and dedicated person. It is my conviction that there is no humanity without giving to others and helping.

 

5 questions to Dieter Olker.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Above all, the team spirit, the professionalism and the product know-how of the employees. This is all rooted in good qualifications and regular training.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
In addition to personal commitment and the ability of the employees, punctuality.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
The Audi Q5 and Swiss watches, whose precision and quality fascinate me.
    
What does quality of life mean for you?
That my family feels good. And that I have enough time to myself and a balance, for example, through holidays, sport and my hobby, photography.

What are your own personal qualities?
I am open to other cultures and generous. I always try to keep my promises. I fight resolutely for my customers and pursue their goals. I don’t give up that easily.

Photos:

Shawn Baldwin

planet 1/2012

5 questions to Dieter Olker.

What are your company’s most important quality characteristics?
Above all, the team spirit, the professionalism and the product know-how of the employees. This is all rooted in good qualifications and regular training.

What do you regard as the signs of a good cargo airline?
In addition to personal commitment and the ability of the employees, punctuality.

Which product or which service outside of the cargo world is characterized by special quality?
The Audi Q5 and Swiss watches, whose precision and quality fascinate me.

What does quality of life mean for you?
That my family feels good. And that I have enough time to myself and a balance, for example, through holidays, sport and my hobby, photography.

What are your own personal qualities?
I am open to other cultures and generous. I always try to keep my promises. I fight resolutely for my customers and pursue their goals. I don’t give up that easily.

 

Photos:

Shawn Baldwin

planet 1/2012


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Speed with clarity.

Lufthansa Cargo transports about 16,000 express shipments per week via the Express Hub in Frankfurt. What counts most are reliable handling and absolute transparency. Good for the customers: the Express Service td.Flash has now become even faster and more convenient.

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12:10 p.m. The LH 439 from Dallas lands on schedule at Frankfurt Airport. Thomas Schwenk has been eagerly awaiting the Airbus 340. However, there is no close relative or friend on board. 

“But there are spare parts for an automotive manufacturer. They have to go straight on to South Africa, where they are required for just-in-sequence assembly line production. Every minute counts.”

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As Apron Coordinator at Lufthansa Cargo, Schwenk is responsible for the transport logistics outside of the Express Terminal. Directly on the apron area, he controls the ramp handling of the express cargo from the USA, of which a number of units are to be earmarked for onward flight to Johannesburg.

Whether it’s spare parts for machines, sample collections, medicines or any other urgent shipments – the name of the best solution is td.Flash. Lufthansa Cargo’s fastest worldwide Express Service operates to more than 340 stations in over 90 countries. “td” stands for “time definite” and means that the cargo arrives at the destination at a promised time. And this means that the logistics professionals in Frankfurt have to be on the move all the time, since two-and-a-half hours is the time that has been set for the transit handling of the express shipments.

In reality, the employees at the Express Terminal usually have to make do with a lot less time. 

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“Often, we only have ten minutes to get the express cargo ready for transit,” Matthias Schulz explains. The 29-year-old Lufthansa Cargo manager is responsible for the handling process of td.Flash and td.X at the location Frankfurt and has been in the airfreight business for over ten years.

At 12:40 p.m., the cargo weighing approximately 17 tons is unloaded from the aircraft from Dallas and driven in transport containers and belly trailers to the 16,400-square-meter Express Terminal. The cargo data have already been available in the EDP of the main hub in Frankfurt since the flight took off. The containers are now opened in what is know as the break-down area of the Express Terminal, a hand scanner checks the cargo data and receipt of each individual shipment via the barcode label.

Shipments with Frankfurt as their destination are taken to the import area for delivery. All transit cargo is transported to the build-up area and prepared for onward flight. The 130 express employees from Lufthansa Cargo thus shift thousands of shipments every day – over 80,000 tons per year. “The customer can keep an eye on his or her cargo items during the entire transportation process,” Schulz explains. 

“Tracking via the Internet, WAP, fax or by phone enables status information requests round the clock.” A clear illustration of how the processes in the Express Hub actually work was also recently made available on the Lufthansa Cargo website (www.lufthansa-cargo.com/expressHub).

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It’s now 12:45 p.m. The spare parts are transported to the build-up area on the “fast lane”. The handling employee is informed about the exact position by EDP. At pallet slot B23 in the transit hub, the colleagues are already busy loading the cargo container for flight LH 572 to Johannesburg. 

All barcode labels are scanned again. “This way, we have the cargo data and current position of the shipment available every second,” express specialist Schulz explains. Precise EDP is one aspect, ambitious and motivated personnel the other in order to guarantee smooth-running and secure processes. 

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“The head of the section on duty and the process controller in the break-down area must be able to assess exactly how many employees are needed at any one time. This is why transparent data is continuously made available for all the persons involved,” says Schulz. 

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These processes are standardized and have already for many years not only been certified according to ISO 9001 ff, but also fulfill the standards of the EFQM model “Business Excellence”.

It’s 12:48 p.m. The entire batch is weighed. “Even though the information on the weights of each individual item of cargo is already stored in our system, we want to be absolutely certain,” Schulz explains. After all, this information is decisive for the flight: it serves as a basis for the calculation of data such as the maximum floor load, the trim and the required amount of fuel.

At 12:50 p.m., the spare parts move securely packaged in a container out of the Express Terminal, destined for Johannesburg. The Boeing 747-400 is already waiting on the apron, the containers are stowed in the lower deck. The Lufthansa Cargo station in South Africa already knows now that is on board the aircraft and can locally confirm the time of availability (TOA) for the customer.

13:45 p.m. The Frankfurt tower gives the all-clear for LH 572: take-off for about 28 tons of cargo. The shipment is on time, the destination will be reached inside the calculated time frame. td.Flash makes it possible.

http://lufthansa-cargo.com/network/hubs-service-center

td.Flash – now with service upgrade

td.Flash is Lufthansa Cargo’s fastest worldwide Express Service. A number of enhancements now make it even faster and more convenient. The most important aspects for the customers: the new Capacity Guarantee enables the guaranteed acceptance of td.Flash shipments weighing up to 200 kilograms – previously 100. They simply have to be booked at least three – and no longer up to six – hours in advance of the latest acceptance time (LAT).

The Performance Guarantee, on the other hand, has been extended: the claims period is now 14 instead of 7 days.

Another new service: the Overnight Option. If a td.Flash shipment is received after 18:00, it is made available for pick-up at many destinations inside Europe by 12:00 on the next day. In addition, the handling times to more than 25 major stations has been reduced, in some cases substantially. Furthermore, the Lufthansa Cargo trucking network in the USA has been extended from previously 12 to now 54 stations.
    
The basics of td.Flash

  •     Time Definite: The shipment arrives at the destination at a promised time.
  •     Tracking: Customers can access status information on shipments at any time.
  •     Quality assurance/Proactive communication: Customers are immediately informed about further procedure if there is a foreseeable delay.
  •     Performance Guarantee: If the shipment is not available at the latest three hours after the promised time of availability at the destination, up to 100 percent of the paid freight charges (max. 10,000 US dollars per air waybill) are reimbursed.
  •     Capacity Guarantee: Guaranteed acceptance of shipments up to 200 kilograms if booked in time.
  •     eBooking: Bookings can be made via GF-X, EDI or via the Lufthansa Cargo website.

Photos:

Nico Krauss

planet 2/2004

td.Flash – now with service upgrade

td.Flash is Lufthansa Cargo’s fastest worldwide Express Service. A number of enhancements now make it even faster and more convenient. The most important aspects for the customers: the new Capacity Guarantee enables the guaranteed acceptance of td.Flash shipments weighing up to 200 kilograms – previously 100. They simply have to be booked at least three – and no longer up to six – hours in advance of the latest acceptance time (LAT).

The Performance Guarantee, on the other hand, has been extended: the claims period is now 14 instead of 7 days.

Another new service: the Overnight Option. If a td.Flash shipment is received after 18:00, it is made available for pick-up at many destinations inside Europe by 12:00 on the next day. In addition, the handling times to more than 25 major stations has been reduced, in some cases substantially. Furthermore, the Lufthansa Cargo trucking network in the USA has been extended from previously 12 to now 54 stations.

The basics of td.Flash

  • Time Definite: The shipment arrives at the destination at a promised time.

  • Tracking: Customers can access status information on shipments at any time.

  • Quality assurance/Proactive communication: Customers are immediately informed about further procedure if there is a foreseeable delay.

  • Performance Guarantee: If the shipment is not available at the latest three hours after the promised time of availability at the destination, up to 100 percent of the paid freight charges (max. 10,000 US dollars per air waybill) are reimbursed.

  • Capacity Guarantee: Guaranteed acceptance of shipments up to 200 kilograms if booked in time.

  • eBooking: Bookings can be made via GF-X, EDI or via the Lufthansa Cargo website.

 

Photos:

Nico Krauss

planet 2/2004