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When logistics saves lives.

Two factors are crucial for aid flights into crisis zones: speed and effective cooperation. For this reason, the German Red Cross (Deutsches Rotes Kreuz – DRK) and Lufthansa Cargo signed a cooperation agreement in December. But how does the aid reach its destination from Berlin? Clemens Pott, Head of Logistics at the DRK, explains.

Clemens Pott, Head of Logistics at the German Red Cross (Deutsches Rotes Kreuz – DRK), is responsible for preparing and implementing DRK aid flights from a logistical perspective. He has been working for the DRK for over 20 years. Until 2002, he was the DRK international delegate for disaster aid.

Clemens Pott, are you permanently in disaster mode? 

Not at all. In the case of longer-term disasters, such as the famine in Africa or the conflict in Syria, we can plan the supply of humanitarian aid further in advance than, say, after a major earthquake.

But in the event of a disaster you need to act quickly. How long is it before an aid flight can take off? 
From making the decision to send aid, we need to allow three to four days to put together a team and the supplies. Of course, we also assess in advance what the situation is like in the crisis zone – for example whether the airport there is still operating, what facilities there are for unloading the aid and how it will reach the disaster area. Then we charter cargo capacity, prepare the customs and transport documents and find a freight forwarder to handle everything locally. The life-saving emergency measures are taken by locals. They are mainly volunteers with our Red Cross and Red Crescent societies in the countries in question. Several days after an earthquake, the humanitarian aid activities begin to focus on preventing infectious diseases and epidemics. At that point, our job is to replace the damaged infrastructure by making medical facilities available and providing supplies of drinking water.

Nevertheless, it’s during the first few days that the clock is really ticking. How do you get hold of an aircraft in such a short period of time? 
We work with several brokers who can find suitable transport within half a day. This could be a full charter or a partial load.

Does the framework agreement with Lufthansa Cargo involve a special process?
We are subject to the provisions of procurement law. This means that we have to get several quotations and award the contract to the most cost-effective supplier. But when we get as far as working together, the partnership offers major advantages. The framework agreement and the fact that our processes are coordinated ensure that Lufthansa Cargo can respond quickly and transport aid cheaply and efficiently to its destination. In particular, in the first few days after a disaster, it is important that no unnecessary problems occur. Everything goes more smoothly when the organizations know one another and function as equal partners.

How do you know what will be needed in the disaster zone?
With 190 national societies, the Red Cross has an organization in almost every country that can quickly give us a reliable assessment of the actual situation. In the case of large-scale disasters, our umbrella organization, the IFRC in Geneva, coordinates our activities and sends an international investigation team to the disaster area that can quickly identify what is needed.

Why do you not simply keep everything in stock?
We have rules within the Red Cross and Red Crescent organization about keeping aid supplies and emergency equipment in stock. Not every country has everything. We are one of the largest national societies and our logistics center in Berlin is one of the biggest within the organization. Our building at Schönefeld airport has a floor area of 4500 square meters and stores several water treatment systems, two health clinics and a complete hospital. It also has a basic camp that is capable of housing up to 150 staff, and aid supplies such as tents and cooking and sanitary equipment for 2500 people. The total value of all this is approximately €4.5 million, so you can see that keeping aid supplies in stock is very costly. This is why we only keep items that are not readily available on the open market. This also applies to products that have a short shelf life, such as medicines.

It’s clear that an aid flight is a very complex undertaking. Where do the difficulties lie?
Of course, it’s important to take local requirements into account – and these include religious dietary rules. For example, beef is taboo in Nepal. We also have to be careful to ensure that we supply the same quality and quantity of aid to all the parties – particularly in civil wars such as that in Syria – so that we are seen to be a neutral organization. We cannot afford to make mistakes in this respect.

Thank you for talking to us!

Interview Anne Schafmeister

Clemens Pott, are you permanently in disaster mode? 

Not at all. In the case of longer-term disasters, such as the famine in Africa or the conflict in Syria, we can plan the supply of humanitarian aid further in advance than, say, after a major earthquake.

But in the event of a disaster you need to act quickly. How long is it before an aid flight can take off?
From making the decision to send aid, we need to allow three to four days to put together a team and the supplies. Of course, we also assess in advance what the situation is like in the crisis zone – for example whether the airport there is still operating, what facilities there are for unloading the aid and how it will reach the disaster area. Then we charter cargo capacity, prepare the customs and transport documents and find a freight forwarder to handle everything locally. The life-saving emergency measures are taken by locals. They are mainly volunteers with our Red Cross and Red Crescent societies in the countries in question. Several days after an earthquake, the humanitarian aid activities begin to focus on preventing infectious diseases and epidemics. At that point, our job is to replace the damaged infrastructure by making medical facilities available and providing supplies of drinking water.

Nevertheless, it’s during the first few days that the clock is really ticking. How do you get hold of an aircraft in such a short period of time?
We work with several brokers who can find suitable transport within half a day. This could be a full charter or a partial load.

Does the framework agreement with Lufthansa Cargo involve a special process?
We are subject to the provisions of procurement law. This means that we have to get several quotations and award the contract to the most cost-effective supplier. But when we get as far as working together, the partnership offers major advantages. The framework agreement and the fact that our processes are coordinated ensure that Lufthansa Cargo can respond quickly and transport aid cheaply and efficiently to its destination. In particular, in the first few days

after a disaster, it is important that no unnecessary problems occur. Everything goes more smoothly when the organizations know one another and function as equal partners.

How do you know what will be needed in the disaster zone?
With 190 national societies, the Red Cross has an organization in almost every country that can quickly give us a reliable assessment of the actual situation. In the case of large-scale disasters, our umbrella organization, the IFRC in Geneva, coordinates our activities and sends an international investigation team to the disaster area that can quickly identify what is needed.

Why do you not simply keep everything in stock?
We have rules within the Red Cross and Red Crescent organization about keeping aid supplies and emergency equipment in stock. Not every country has everything. We are one of the largest national societies and our logistics center in Berlin is one of the biggest within the organization. Our building at Schönefeld airport has a floor area of 4500 square meters and stores several water treatment systems, two health clinics and a complete hospital. It also has a basic camp that is capable of housing up to 150 staff, and aid supplies such as tents and cooking and sanitary equipment for 2500 people. The total value of all this is approximately €4.5 million, so you can see that keeping aid supplies in stock is very costly. This is why we only keep items that are not readily available on the open market. This also applies to products that have a short shelf life, such as medicines.

It’s clear that an aid flight is a very complex undertaking. Where do the difficulties lie?
Of course, it’s important to take local requirements into account – and these include religious dietary rules. For example, beef is taboo in Nepal. We also have to be careful to ensure that we supply the same quality and quantity of aid to all the parties – particularly in civil wars such as that in Syria – so that we are seen to be a neutral organization. We cannot afford to make mistakes in this respect.

Thank you for talking to us!

Interview Anne Schafmeister

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In December 2016, Lufthansa Cargo and the DRK signed a framework agreement that will allow the two organizations to provide aid more quickly.

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Lufthansa Cargo has been cooperating with Germany’s Relief Coalition Aktion Deutschland Hilft since February 2013 and recently entered into an agreement with the online air freight aid platform Airlink to provide support.

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Aid for Uganda

Since 2013, around 800,000 people have fled the civil war in South Sudan and made their way to Uganda. Every day around 3000 people seek refuge there, and more than 80 percent of them are women and children. In February, Lufthansa Cargo and the DRK transported components for a water treatment plant to Uganda because there is also an ongoing drought in the region and millions of people have no access to clean water. The DRK is building wells and training volunteers to maintain standpipes. 

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The international Red Cross and Red Crescent movement, with 190 national societies and more than 100 million members and volunteers, is the world’s largest humanitarian organization. As part of this movement, the Deutsches Rotes Kreuz has been providing aid for people in conflict situations, disasters and emergencies for more than 150 years, solely on the basis of the extent of their need. The Red Cross has a network of eleven global logistics centers in the northern hemisphere. It also has three regional warehouses in Panama, Kuala Lumpur and Dubai. Its major campaigns are financed by public contributions and, most importantly, by donations.

Donations

Donations

Please visit drk.de/hilfe-fuer-uganda to make a donation or transfer it to the following bank account quoting the reference “Hungersnot”:
Deutsches Rotes Kreuz, Bank fuer Sozialwirtschaft
IBAN: DE 9837 0205 0000 0502 3453 BIC: BFSWDE33XXX

Photos:
Lufthansa Cargo (4), DRK (2)


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Quality at low cost.

At Kuehne + Nagel, consignments are increasingly sent by td.Basic. Which comes as no surprise, given the many advantages the new low-price product offers customers.

Marko Gunzenhäuser’s response is immediate: “For us, td.Basic is the perfect fit for what used to be a gap in our product range.” The 44-yearold is the Regional Manager of Airfreight for the South-West region at Kuehne + Nagel in Stuttgart. The logistics giant’s customers in Stuttgart are mainly SMEs in the mechanical engineering, automotive and pharmaceuticals industries. Just under 70 employees look after airfreight exports at the Kuehne + Nagel Cargo Center in Leinfelden- Echterdingen. “We dispatch shipments of all kinds: time-critical and temperature-controlled cargo as well as complete vehicles and standard freight,” says Philip Müller, the export manager in charge. “This new td.Basic product increasingly led us to give preference to Lufthansa Cargo.”

Especially in cases where time may be important but not everything, consignments travel around the globe via td.Basic at an attractive price – and with the accustomed quality of service provided by Lufthansa Cargo. “The product can only be booked online,” says Elke Schäffer from the Lufthansa Cargo Center in Stuttgart. “Delivery is made no later than the time quoted by us, which in turn depends on the time the cargo is delivered to us. We plan and book the entire routing within the specified time window.” During an online enquiry, the availability of td.Basic is checked in real time. 

“Making a booking is as simple as can be, and all the details about the planned flight are always transparent,” as Philip Müller explains.

Whether it’s two tons of material for the pharmaceuticals industry to Almaty, 500 kilograms of machinery parts to Bombay or a ton of electronic equipment destined for Beijing which, due to its fragility, is to be sent airfreight after all – for the 31-year-old export manager the benefits of using td.Basic are obvious: “We often have cases where the goods do not need to be delivered to their destination immediately, but where it is important that the freight arrives safely and reliably instead, and that it does not need to be reloaded along the way, for example. The new td.Basic product combines cheap rates, high service quality and a highly efficient network.”

For Kuehne + Nagel’s Regional Manager Airfreight Marko Gunzenhäuser, some of Lufthansa Cargo’s other strengths come into play as well: “Lufthansa Cargo is a reliable partner and is of vital importance to us because it allows us to cover all facets of our business with them. The new td.Basic also uses the extensive network of routes that is in place for the premium products. With many airlines cutting back on freight capacity, Lufthansa Cargo will become even more important for us in the future.”

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Elke Schäffer (r.) from the Lufthansa Cargo Center in Stuttgart explains the booking procedure to Philip Müller.

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Benefits:

  • Transport product in the lower price segment.

  • At the customary Lufthansa Cargo quality.

  • Online availability check in real time.

  • Booking and flight details transparent.

  • Pricing information available immediately thanks to online booking.

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Checking availability and obtaining pricing information takes just seconds. All the booking details are transparent at all times.

Photos:
Alex Kraus


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Keys and wings.

Each one is a hand-made masterpiece – coveted around the world. Many of the grand pianos made by Steinway & Sons reach their destination via td.Pro.

It was love at the first sound for the Chinese pianist: the wood, the sheen, and especially the sound, a sound that enjoys an exalted reputation among music lovers and in concert halls around the world. In the selection hall of Steinway & Sons in Hamburg – amid a constant coming and going of the great concert pianists of our time and of concert hall experts – he chose “his own” D-274. Master piano builder Erhart Steinhauß, having just tuned the instrument one last time, lowers the fallboard and attaches the “Selected” sign.

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It took around one year to build the D-274, and now it will be leaving Hamburg on its way to China – as standard freight shipped td.Pro on board a Lufthansa Cargo plane. Sitting on steel transport legs, the grand piano is carefully rolled into the elevator on the way to the shipping department. The elevator descends to the accompaniment of the high-pitched buzz of the piano string winding machine and the many-voiced hum of strings struck emanating from one of the brightly lit production halls on the first floor. Then the elevator doors open to the basement, and the shipping team of Martin Lewis takes over.

Td.Pro is perfect for grand pianos: Gentle and quick.

The D-274 undergoes a number of visual quality checks for the very last time. Should it ever be required, this is where the varnish is touched up or repolished. As in production, it is all craftsmanship, meticulousness and devotion to the task at
hand: “All of us throughout the building work with our hands
and our ears only,” says Lewis.
The Englishman from Liverpool has been with Steinway & Sons in Hamburg for eleven years now. He and his team cover the entire world map of concert grand pianos: from its Hamburg base, Steinway & Sons deliver to Europe, Australia,
Africa and the boom market in Asia. “Over recent years Asia has clearly become the market exhibiting the strongest growth. People in China especially love the piano, and that includes our grand pianos,” says Lewis.
Only the American market is supplied from Steinway’s New York production facilities – a rule that comes with exceptions. Instruments made by Steinway & Sons are coveted around the world: in the 2015/2016 concert season, 96.5 percent of pianists chose Steinway. The grand pianos from the company established in 1853 by Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg (a German-born immigrant to the United States, after he changed his name to Henry Engelhard Steinway) are found in all of the world’s leading concert halls – at Carnegie Hall and at the Sydney Opera House as well as at the new Elbphilharmonie. The wings of Lufthansa Cargo have proved to be essential in the journey to the world’s concert stages and to pianists and music lovers everywhere – as well as for trips back to the Hamburg base for major repairs. “We ship 40 percent of our instruments by airfreight,” says Lewis. The principal reason for doing so is that transport by air is a great deal easier on the cargo than transport by sea. 

Georges Ammann, one of the highly specialised concert technicians preparing instruments for the performances of Steinway concert pianists like Mitsuko Uchida and Lang Lang on every continent, explains: “The boys from Lufthansa Cargo do a really good job, also in terms of handling the instruments.
On board a ship, however, the grand pianos are exposed to strong vibrations and large fluctuations in temperatures for a period of weeks. This puts enormous stresses on an instrument.”

Time is also a factor: “Customers want to take possession of their instruments as quickly as possible. Airfreight takes three to four days, whereas seafreight can often take more than six weeks,” adds Martin Lewis. Prior to being dispatched by airfreight, the D-274 is covered in three layers of antistatic foil and paper, and then bolted onto a wooden transport sled. The pedal system and the legs are packaged in separate cardboard boxes. The whole grand piano is then placed inside an outer carton bearing Shockwatch stickers. The shock indicator is a reliable means of gauging whether an instrument has remained within the prescribed shock tolerances throughout the transport.

Schockwatch-tested

At this point the transport company A. Hartrodt takes over. Their staff members are well-versed in these kinds of jobs: their authorized representative has been transporting grand pianos from Steinway & Sons to airports for many years. “We’re proud to have been entrusted with the responsibility for this task,” says Sören Gräzuweit, team leader for Airfreight Export Hamburg of A. Hartrodt. At the World Cargo Center at Hamburg Airport, the D-274 declared as td.Pro cargo is x-rayed and then placed on an airfreight pallet. On board a Hartrodt truck, the journey then usually continues on to Frankfurt, from where the Lufthansa
Cargo freighters take off. Other employees of A. Hartrodt will be ready to receive the grand piano in Hong Kong and to move it to its final destination. Where yet another act of devoted craftsmanship will be performed: a Steinway technician will check the instrument and tune it – and then it will be ready to delight with its perfect sound.

eu.steinway.com
www.hartrodt.com

td.Pro is perfect for grand pianos: Gentle and quick

The D-274 undergoes a number of visual quality checks for the very last time. Should it ever be required, this is where the varnish is touched up or repolished. As in production, it is all craftsmanship, meticulousness and devotion to the task at hand: “All of us throughout the building work with our hands and our ears only,” says Lewis.

The Englishman from Liverpool has been with Steinway & Sons in Hamburg for eleven years now. He and his team cover the entire world map of concert grand pianos: from its Hamburg base, Steinway & Sons deliver to Europe, Australia,
Africa and the boom market in Asia. “Over recent years Asia has clearly become the market exhibiting the strongest growth. People in China especially love the piano, and that includes our grand pianos,” says Lewis. 
Only the American market is supplied from Steinway’s New York production facilities – a rule that comes with exceptions. Instruments made by Steinway & Sons are coveted around the world: in the 2015/2016 concert season, 96.5 percent of pianists chose Steinway. The grand pianos from the company established in 1853 by Heinrich Engelhard Steinweg (a German-born immigrant to the United States, after he changed his name to Henry Engelhard Steinway) are found in all of the world’s leading concert halls – at Carnegie Hall and at the Sydney Opera House as well as at the new Elbphilharmonie. The wings of Lufthansa Cargo have proved to be essential in the journey to the world’s concert stages and to pianists and music lovers everywhere – as well as for trips back to the Hamburg base for major repairs. “We ship 40 percent of our instruments by airfreight,” says Lewis. The principal reason for doing so is that transport by air is a great deal easier on the cargo than transport by sea. 

Georges Ammann, one of the highly specialised concert technicians preparing instruments for the performances of Steinway concert pianists like Mitsuko Uchida and Lang Lang on every continent, explains: “The boys from Lufthansa Cargo do a really good job, also in terms of handling the instruments.

On board a ship, however, the grand pianos are exposed to strong vibrations and large fluctuations in temperatures for a period of weeks. This puts enormous stresses on an instrument.” Time is also a factor: “Customers want to take possession of their instruments as quickly as possible. Airfreight takes three to four days, whereas seafreight can often take more than six weeks,” adds Martin Lewis. Prior to being dispatched by airfreight, the D-274 is covered in three layers of antistatic foil and paper, and then bolted onto a wooden transport sled. The pedal system and the legs are packaged in separate cardboard boxes. The whole grand piano is then placed inside an outer carton bearing Shockwatch stickers. The shock indicator is a reliable means of gauging whether an instrument has remained within the prescribed shock tolerances throughout the transport.

Schockwatch-tested

At this point the transport company A. Hartrodt takes over. Their staff members are well-versed in these kinds of jobs: their authorized representative has been transporting grand pianos from Steinway & Sons to airports for many years. “We’re proud to have been entrusted with the responsibility for this task,” says Sören Gräzuweit, team leader for Airfreight Export Hamburg of A. Hartrodt. At the World Cargo Center at Hamburg Airport, the D-274 declared as td.Pro cargo is x-rayed and then placed on an airfreight pallet. On board a Hartrodt truck, the journey then usually continues on to Frankfurt, from where the Lufthansa Cargo freighters take off. Other employees of A. Hartrodt will be ready to receive the grand piano in Hong Kong and to move it to its final destination. Where yet another act of devoted craftsmanship will be performed: a Steinway technician will check the instrument and tune it – and then it will be ready to delight with its perfect sound.

eu.steinway.com
www.hartrodt.com

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Before the handling professionals from A. Hartrodt put the valuable freight through the x-ray machine and prepare it for transportation by Lufthansa Cargo, it is carefully wrapped and packaged at Steinway & Sons.

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Once packaging is completed, a Shockwatch sticker is put on the box – the colour of the shock indicator changes to red if it is exposed to strong vibrations.

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Martin Lewis and his shipping team at Steinway & Sons ensure the grand pianos are well protected using foil, a transport sled and a cardboard enclosure.

Photos:
Sebastian Vollmert


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Pharma ninjas.

In the past, Kōka was home to legendary ninjas who produced herbal medicines. Today, in the small Japanese city Bayer produces innovative drugs for the huge domestic market. The raw materials are supplied by airfreight.

 

A small town on the south west of Japan’s largest island, Honshu: a museum honouring legendary ninja warriors, lush vegetation with vast woodlands, plenty of rivers and almost 90,000 people spread over several locations. In the rural community of Kōka, people are linked to Japan’s major metropolitan areas in that they receive first-class treatment in the event of illness. Japan’s public health system is seen as one of the most highly developed worldwide.
It is based on the principle of providing treatment for all 127 million of the island state’s inhabitants. And ever more of them will probably require regular treatment or prescription medicines. One third of Japan’s population is now over 60 and therefore potentially more likely to suffer from cardiovascular diseases, including strokes, than younger people. Clearly they similarly benefit from the high standard of treatment.

Strategic Importance 

Whether young or old: the city of Kōka has played a major role in treating the Japanese population for hundreds of years. In times past, the region’s ninjas were skilled in preparing medicines based on herbs in addition to martial arts. Today, Kōka is home to the Supply Center Shiga, the plant of Bayer Yakuhin, subsidiary of the German global company Bayer, named after the surrounding prefecture.
“Japan is of particular strategic importance to Bayer,” says Dr. Hirohito

 

 

Katayama, Plant Head and Head of Product Supply Japan of Bayer Yakuhin. After the US, Japan’s pharmaceutical market is the second largest worldwide in relation to drug products originally developed and marketed by pharmaceutical companies.
Even though it lags behind the growth figures generated in the newly industrialized countries, Japan’s pharmaceutical and healthcare sector is developing well. This also has an effect on Bayer’s business in Japan, which in 2015 gener - ated 2.3 billion euros nationwide – 4.4 percent more than last year.
Bayer Yakuhin employs about 2,660 employees in Japan. “In 2015, Bayer Yakuhin jumped to tenth place in the ranking of pharmaceutical companies in Japan,” says Hirohito Katayama. The manager attributes the significant growth in a fiercely competitive market to the innovative products manufactured at the Supply Center Shiga, which include tablets for cardiovascular diseases for example.
What makes the products innovative? Developers focus on efficacy as well as drug formulation techniques. For example, certain tablets have been designed so that they are easy to chew and can be taken without water. “That makes it easier for patients who have a limited water intake,” explains Katayama. The tablet size has been reduced in another product. This means it is easier to swallow and does not lose any of its effect.

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Successful business: in 2015, Bayer generated sales of 2.3 billion euros with Japanese customers.

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Standing united: Dr. Hirohito Katayama, Head of Product Supply Japan at Bayer Yakuhin (far left), with Yoshihiro Yamamoto (Lufthansa Cargo) and the Bayer Supply Chain Manager Peter G. Meyer (Asia Pacific) and Nobuyuki Hirono (Japan).

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Control: drug freight is often transported in a temperaturecontrolled environment to preserve drug efficacy. Prime importance is attached to handling.

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Push: Unicooler containers, used by Lufthansa Cargo as part of the product Cool/td, enable freight temperatures to be managed between minus 20 and plus 30 degrees Celsius.

A third product, a granular powder filled in small bags, is similarly geared towards people with swallowing difficulties. Furthermore, Bayer Yakuhin has introduced tablets with a different time release of the active ingredients so that patients need only take one per day instead of two units.
The speed at which innovations like these reach the market is also worthy of note. According to Hirohito Katayama, in this respect Japan is faster than most other countries in granting approval to market new drugs: “This means the latest treatment methods are quickly made available to patients in Japan.”

Smooth Product Replenishment 

To avoid the replenishment of products from the Supply Center Shiga grinding to a halt, a Lufthansa Boeing 747-400 lands at Kansai International Airport – IATA abbreviation: KIX – just outside Osaka, on a weekday morning punctually at 8.40 a.m. In the belly of the passenger jet from Frankfurt are half a dozen Unicooler containers for the temperaturemanaged transport. The container displays show an internal temperature of five degrees Celsius. “We transport goods for Bayer Yakuhin to here every week,” says Yoshihiro Yamamoto, Regional Manager Western Japan of Lufthansa Cargo. The manufacturer has been placing its trust in Lufthansa Cargo since 2008.
“We import both raw materials and preliminary stage products from abroad,”

 

 

says Hirohito Katayama. The goods are flown in from various European countries. For example, the Unicooler containers, which have arrived in the Boeing 747-400 – flight number LH740 – have already completed a feeder flight from Milan to Frankfurt. Bayer finished products for the Japanese market also regularly land on board Lufthansa machines at KIX Airport. However, they are not supplied to the plant in Kōka, but rather are transported directly to the manufacturer’s distribution centre in Osaka.
Heike Prinz has been President of Bayer Yakuhin since the beginning of this year. “Reliably providing patients with highquality and innovative products is our mission,” says the German national. “We attach great importance to a resilient supply network, and therefore work with reliable carriers such as Lufthansa Cargo.”
The goods make the last leg from KIX, spectacularly located on man-made islands in the bay of the city with close to three million inhabitants, to Supply Center Shiga via truck. The 140-kilometer trip takes about two hours. Once offloaded, the materials are stored for precisely defined periods in a temperature-controlled environment before processing commences under the most stringent of hygiene precautions. Delivery and production conditions that would have even delighted the legendary Kōka ninjas.

Pharmaceutical Product Handling in KIX

Lufthansa Cargo has been providing ultra-fast handling services for Bayer Yakuhin at Kansai International Airport (KIX) just outside Osaka since 2011. A customs agent clarifies the necessary formalities regarding the consignments that arrive each week on board a Boeing 747-400, stored in Unicooler containers, in just 70 minutes. Meanwhile, the goods, which are as valuable as they are sensitive, are stored in Lufthansa Cargo’s cooled import warehouse to protect them from exposure to the sun. Excellent infrastructure is in place via the KIX Medica Pharmaceutical Warehouse for the breakdown and interim storage until collection by the truck forwarding agent.

 

Photos:
Ben Weller


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Car enthusiasts.

Test engineers put prototypes through their paces in the world’s most remote places. Everything required for these tests in terms of logistics is supplied by the IQS Group, as Alexis von Hoensbroech, Board Member Product and Sales at Lufthansa Cargo, found out during the “planet” on-site visit.

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Safe and economical at the same time: two-tier loading at IQS.

It is only an additional 26 centimeters in height, but they determine whether the sports car will still fit sideways into the lower deck of a Boeing 747-8 passenger plane. That is why the IQS loading equipment specialists have lashed specially built additional timber flooring onto the pallet. Sitting on this pedestal, the low-slung sports car with the powerful sound now fits snugly into the curved walls of the jumbo jet. Neither the spoiler nor the rear valance make contact. 

“Sometimes it is the simplest solutions to ensure that the handling of a car can be carried out safely, efficiently and cost-effectively,” says Marc Oedekoven, Chairman of the Management Board of the IQS Group. To demonstrate this very fact to Lufthansa Cargo Board Member Alexis von Hoensbroech, Oedekoven moves the aluminum template of the 747 into position once more – and lo, the bulky proportions of the Audi will make optimal use of the pallet positions on board. At the same time, the consignment will still fit into the maximum loading height of 1.63 meters despite being raised slightly, as verified by the laser-powered measuring equipment at the IQS headquarters in Langenbach near Munich Airport.

Smart ideas are part of the repertoire

When it comes to shipping automobiles by airfreight, the IQS Group can draw on any number of smart ideas of this kind. They include the enclosed 20-foot container with the many convenient doors which can even accommodate the fairly high G-Class cars from Mercedes. Or the demountable tarp container: ideal for one-way transports, because when it is returned to the IQS central warehouse empty, this “packaging solution” only takes up a minimal amount of space, which also saves money. 
The brains behind all these inventions is Norbert Wegener, one of the cofounders of IQS back in 1998, and sole owner of the Group since 2009. 

IQS achieved its growth mainly with the transportation of test automobiles, trade fair and event vehicles as well as prototypes – a business that calls for a great deal of expertise and which depends on absolute discretion and trustworthiness. For a long time now, the Group has also been shipping old-timers, racing cars, armored limousines, military vehicles, test equipment, automotive parts and engines as well as valuable private vehicles of people who can afford to use this service. Last year over 4,000 cars were transported by air.
In addition to vast amount of special expertise, it is the IQS Group’s broad positioning that has been instrumental in its success. The Group has subsidiaries in the United States and in Dubai, as well as running its own handling and consultancy business and other specialist services providers: IQS Business Travel, for example, arranges the itineraries for the engineers of major car manufacturers as they travel to test tracks on almost every continent, in locations that are for the most part kept secret. Global Automotive Testing Support (GATS) handles the development, construction and operation of test tracks. These sites include mechanical workshops as well as offices and mobile test stations, all in the middle of nowhere.
“We keep on growing, and today we are more than just a company transporting automobiles: thanks to our specialized subsidiaries, we can now also offer our customers the option to do their one-stop shopping with us. Aircraft are about the only thing we do not operate ourselves yet,” adds the experienced airfreight manager Oedekoven with a wry grin. “That is why we depend on the partnership with quality carriers like Lufthansa Cargo.” But why is there so much testing going on in the first place? Internationalisation and the large variety of models still represent major forces driving the automotive industry. All models about to be launched on the market need to be tested beforehand, often under the most extreme conditions found anywhere in the world. “This requires a massive effort, and it represents a market niche that provides specialist logistics enterprises like IQS with great opportunities for growth,” says Alexis von Hoensbroech during the “planet” on-site visit in Langenbach.

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In addition to test vehicles and prototypes, IQS constantly ships trade fair vehicles to major automobile shows and precious old-timers to collectors and auctions around the world on board Lufthansa Cargo. The beautiful lines of this Jaguar E-Type captured the eye of our “planet” photographer.

Testers in search of extremes

It is on the frozen lakes in northern Scandinavia where control systems technicians go to optimize assistance systems such as ESP and ABS, for example. Engine development engineers test their diesel and petrol engines at temperatures as low as minus 30 degrees Celsius or even colder. Gearbox specialists in turn “escape” the winter in the northern hemisphere and head to the deserts of South Africa to test whether their gearboxes will still perform under extremely high temperatures. And designers of fuel supply systems will ascend mountain passes up in the Andes to experiment and find ways to reliably provide engines with fuel even at high altitudes. “The exact test locations are kept secret,” explains Oedekoven, because these tests often involve vehicles that are not yet available on the market. Testing goes on constantly, and on virtually every continent. The aim is always to push the vehicles to the limit of what is technically feasible by subjecting them to the most difficult conditions. It is German automobile manufacturers with their reputation for quality in particular who are constantly coming up with innovative ways of torturing their vehicles, and they have put in place an extensive testing regime.

“IQS, as a German provider of specialist services, have positioned themselves very cleverly,“ says Alexis von Hoensbroech. “With our extensive network offering belly space and freighters as well as the freighter-on-demand service, we at Lufthansa Cargo also offer a competitive service in this segment.” As it happens, IQS ships around 20 percent of its tonnage by Lufthansa Cargo. Oedekoven: “Lufthansa Cargo has all the required equipment, their personnel are well trained, and their flight schedules can be relied on. And that is a good thing, because we want to continue to grow.”
Von Hoensbroech also anticipates continuing growth in demand for logistics services from the development departments of the major automobile manufacturers. “Current trends like electromobility and connectivity will further boost the need for testing. And this is where we certainly want to be part of the action!”
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Volkswagen fans come in various flavors: IQS “grew up” providing services to the Volkswagen Group. Marc Oedekoven is the proud owner of a VW 1500 hatchback, manufactured in 1971 and passed down from his grandmother. With his five kids, a VW “Bulli” van is a must for Alexis von Hoensbroech. Small wonder then that during the “planet” on-site visit, the two managers sit happily in yet another legendary product from Wolfsburg – the Beetle.

Photos:
Matthias Aletsee, Lufthansa Cargo, Audi AG


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Tunneling a way through.

Shorter travel times and stimulus for the economy – tunnels can improve living conditions for people in many regions of the world. This engineering feat is possible thanks to the machines of market leader Herrenknecht – a company that is dependent, surprisingly often, on a reliable airfreight partner.
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Until recently, the driving from the Istanbul Chamber of Commerce on the Golden Horn to the port on the Asian side meant one and a half hours of stop and go traffic. From the end of December, it only takes 15 minutes. Just before the turn of the year, the twin-deck Eurasia Tunnel was opened for traffic in the metropolitan area with a population of 14-million. The engineering master plan 106 meters below the sea provides lasting relief for the chronically clogged-up bridges above the Bosphorus Strait. 

Train journeys between Zurich and Milan have similarly been significantly shortened since December: you can now board a train in the city on the Limmat River in the morning and go shopping at Milan at midday. In addition, trains no longer need to cross the Gotthard Pass at a snail’s pace. To that end, four Herrenknecht hard rock machines bored more than 85 kilometers of the two main tunnels each spanning 57 kilometers.

Regions come together, people reach their workplaces quicker, trade is supported and the environment is protected. Whether the Bosphorus or the Alpine massif: today, geographical barriers can be overcome in many cases thanks to modern tunnel structures. In that respect, small as well as huge tunnel boring machines from Herrenknecht play a key role worldwide. A rotating cutting wheel, equipped with socalled cutting knives and disc cutters, swiftly works its way through the underground ahead. The excavated earth is removed via conveyors or pumped off via slurry lines. Depending on the type of machine, protection provided by the shield chamber means precast concrete segments can be additionally transported through the completed part of the tunnel and assembled by the erector to form a new tunnel ring. The tunnel carcass is therefore extended ring by ring.

No challenge seems to be too big for the founder and Chairman of the Board of Management, Martin Herrenknecht, and his team of engineers, machine operators, geologists and more than 90 other professionals. For example, at the Bosphorus crossing, the huge boring machine needed to withstand a water pressure of eleven bar. A particular challenge involved developing a cutting wheel that allows for the safe replacement of extraction tools from inside the cutting wheel, including under enormous pressure.

The solution comprised cutting wheel arms that are accessible under atmospheric conditions and a transfer system developed for the tools by Herrenknecht. At the Gotthard Pass, unstable mountain layers caused difficulties for the tunnel builders. Nevertheless, the commissioned companies completed the task of excavating the tunnel one year ahead of schedule because the four huge cutting wheels called Sissi, Heidi, Gabi 1 and Gabi 2 were not only extremely reliable in terms of drift, they also notched up a speed record of 56 meters a day eating their way through the underground. In total, the gripper machines, which are several hundred meters long, excavated 13.5 million cubic meters of material from the Alpine massif. That is five times the volume of the Pyramid of Cheops.

Herrenknecht can look back on 3,100 completed projects in 80 countries. 5,000 employees worldwide now work for the company that was established in 1977. New motorway and metro tunnels are just as much a part of the area of application as expansion of the supply and disposal infrastructure for waste water, drinking water, electricity, oil and gas.

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Herrenknecht’s drift machines pass beneath mountains, rivers, straits and densely populated areas, as is demonstrated by the company’s recent major projects. In Doha, Qatar, 21 Herrenknecht boring machines realized a project in a class of their own: only 26 months of construction were required for the 111-kilometer metro lines. The Crossrail project in London – a new rail line crossing the dynamic metropolitan area – also looks set to be completed in record time. Six earth pressure balance shields and two mixshields are boring their way precisely and safely amid sewers, gas pipelines and underground railway lines. As a result, Herrenknecht has created the foundation for a new, fast rail link for 200 million passengers annually between Heathrow in the west and Abbey Wood in the east.

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Modules transported to the construction site

Herrenknecht tunnel boring machines (TBMs) are normally unique, in particular if large diameters are required. Design, production and assembly of the giants which, in part, are several hundred meters long and made up of many thousands of individual parts, can therefore take up to one year. Of course, following comprehensive tests and acceptance by the customer, the high-tech equipment needs to be brought to the location where it is to be used. It embarks on the journey after being dismantled to create the largest possible parts. “Transport and logistics requirements need to be taken into consideration early on during the development phase,” explains Josef Gruseck, member of the Herrenknecht management.

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2,000 tons of freight each year

“In some cases, a TBM shield can be produced as a whole because it only has a few kilometers to travel on the truck as a single, major item. In other cases, the same component may need to be dismantled because of its size, the transport route and the construction site environment to reach the location where it is to be used. We construct the TBMs such that the construction site and transport-related size and weight requirements are met. Therefore, our transport experts have a seat at the table with the engineers on each major project from the outset.”

Trucks, container vessels and airplanes – Herrenknecht knows how to make the most of each carrier. “Airfreight is an integral part of our logistics – about 2,000 tons on average each year,” says Gruseck.

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“In terms of procurement, it is just as important as transportation, in particular when supplying spare parts to the construction sites. TBMs are highly complex systems whose productive capacity is also conditional on the supply of wear-and-tear parts in line with requirements and on time.” Rainer Siegenführ, Shipping Head at Herrenknecht in Schwanau explains: “We ensure that parts that are immediately required arrive on site as quickly as possible. Thanks to service locations worldwide, we have proximity to our customers but still need to react quickly.” This may entail the most varied of parts from one-gram lightweight O rings to 32-ton main bearings.
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Perfect service via td.Pro

For transporting hazardous goods, Herrenknecht relies on Lufthansa Cargo – “Because of the quality and reliability in processing hazardous goods consignments,” says Peter Buss, who has a wealth of experience in the forwarding sector. He has been at Herrenknecht for 15 years now and specializes in the airfreight sector. In addition to the service locations, Herrenknecht operates local production and assembly locations – for example in Guangzhou in southern China – which maintain continual and lively contact with the headquarters in Germany.
Various core components are manufactured at the headquarters in Germany and shipped to the locations. Depending on the construction site location, Herrenknecht ships between 60 percent and 80 percent of airfreight via the carrier Streck Transport from Freiburg and Lufthansa Cargo. “Most of the consignments are sent via td.Pro,” says Peter Buss.

“We also attach importance to maintaining direct contact at all times with the decision makers at the forwarding agent and the carrier, and that is the case with Streck and Lufthansa Cargo.” Michael Engelhart, Sales Manager at Lufthansa Cargo in Baden-Wuerttemberg, and Alex Witzigmann from Streck, deal with all Herrenknecht matters. “We all come from the region, speak a common language and share a point of view: it is only time to knock off work once a transport operation has been successfully completed,” says Witzigmann.

“Herrenknecht is a fascinating customer,” says Engelhart. “Whether underground railway construction in China or laying pipes in Brazil: you are always part of something really big.”

 

Quality and reliability are not the only arguments in favor of a transport operation via Lufthansa Cargo. “In many cases, it is simply more economical to fly a component,” says Josef Gruseck. And the customer’s requirements always have the highest priority, whether small pipeline construction sites or highly complex mega projects such as the metro construction in Doha involving 21 tunnel boring machines and several international construction joint ventures. “In general, our machines are expected to be extremely reliable. On occasion things need to move very quickly.” 

 

www.herrenknecht.com

Photos:

Herrenknecht and Matthias Aletsee

Pioneers from Germany

Pioneers from Germany

Herrenknecht is the only company that supplies modern tunnel boring machines for all construction ground types and diameters from ten centimeters to 19 meters. The product range comprises machines for the construction of traffic tunnels as well as supply and disposal tunnels such as pipelines and sewers. Herrenknecht provides integrated overall solutions with project-specific equipment and service packages. In addition to tunnel boring machines, the company supplies separation systems, conveyors, navigation systems, rolling stock systems and entire tubbing factories. The company furthermore develops systems for the sinking of vertical shafts in great depths and for excavating inclined shafts. The portfolio also includes boring machines that penetrate the earth to a depth of 8,000 meters. In 2015, the Herrenknecht Group generated turnover of almost 1.3 billion euros. It employs approximately 5,000 employees and is represented worldwide with 76 subsidiaries and holding companies.

 


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It's in!

The launch of the Airbus A350 is a milestone in passenger aviation. And Lufthansa Cargo will be part of the global service infrastructure: via a Boeing 777F, the A350’s huge engines quickly reach any destination.

The transport stand containing the huge engine module is slowly pushed through the cargo door of the Boeing 777F. The area between the packed fan module and the freighter’s loading area ceiling spans just a few centimeters but is important for Lufthansa Cargo. In conjunction with Lufthansa Technology, Lufthansa Cargo has successfully trialed a new transport stand from Rolls-Royce. The manufacturer of the Trent XWB engines for the Airbus A350 pulled off a quantum leap in the process: flying one of the huge aggregates – dismantled inindividual modules – in a Boeing 777F. 
This small mosaic part is of strategic importance to Lufthansa. The A350 has become the beacon of hope of passenger airlines worldwide thanks to its range and efficiency, and Lufthansa Cargo is ready to provide service infrastructure for the aircraft worldwide.

In the assembled condition alone, each Trent XWB weighs seven tons, has a fan diameter and therefore a height and breadth of three meters and a total length of five meters. A transport stand is required at all times, adding to the weight and dimensions. That is too big even for the largest freight door of the Lufthansa Cargo B777F.

 

As a result, the engine can actually only be flown via special freighters such as the Antonov An-124, the Airbus Beluga or a Boeing C-17. This is a considerable disadvantage, in particular in the event that an Aircraft on Ground (AOG) is reported due to engine problems.
In other words, painfully high revenue losses and costs quickly add up and remedial action needs to be taken promptly. Such a situation calls for the delivery of a replacement engine – wherever it is required worldwide.

Three steps were necessary to create the prerequisites for such a Triple Seven assignment. First of all, Rolls-Royce developed a new type of transport stand on which the engine can be stored and divided into two large modules to fit in the B777F. In a second step, the team made up of employees fromLufthansa Cargo, Lufthansa Technik and Lufthansa Technik Logistik Services trialed the load with an original engine. Rolls-Royce had made it available especially for the test load. To that end, the employees initially separated the fan from the core engine and removed the spinner and fan blades. The two modules could then be independently moved and loaded on the fan case stand and the core split engine stand.

 

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New Lashing Concept

The third step involved reviewing and releasing the lashing concept for the transport stand in the freight area of the B777F. So-called supplementary procedures for the Weight & Balance Manual of the B777F specify how freight items, which cannot be secured via the existing strapping system because of their size, are to be loaded and lashed. As in the case of the GE90 engines of the Triple Seven, which are almost equal in size and for which corresponding supplementary procedures have long been in place, Lufthansa Cargo’s own loading and lashing plan is used that specifies how many straps need to be applied to secure the two transport stands and the points in the freight area where they need to be placed.

Irrespective of the huge dimensions, the Trent XWB fits in the Lufthansa Cargo B777F. And it is a little ironic that it is a Boeing freighter that secures the A350’s triumph. With a loading concept ideally geared towards the freight and freighter, Lufthansa Cargo is now ready for the A350 era.

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A large part of the success: dividing the Trent XWB engine creates the prerequisites for loading in the B777F. Lufthansa Cargo can therefore provide worldwide service for the A350.

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Separating engine components is a highly complex matter. Rolls-Royce technicians therefore instructed the Lufthansa employees on how the components need to be dismantled and reassembled.

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Focus: The A350-900

The A350-900 is the world’s most modern and environmentally-friendly long-haul aircraft. It consumes 25 percent less kerosene and creates 25 percent fewer emissions than comparable models. Its noise footprint is up to 50 percent smaller. At the core of the twin-jet concept are two Trent XWB-84 type engines, each with thrust of 374.5 kilonewtons and a weight of 7,277 kilograms. In December 2016, the first of the ten Lufthansa planes was based in Munich. Initial destinations will be Delhi and Boston. The aircraft has room for 293 passengers: 48 guests in Business Class, 21 in Premium Economy and 224 in Economy Class.

Photos:
Jürgen Mai, Lufthansa Cargo

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Wine on wings.

South African wines have a very distinctive character. To preserve this on the journey from Cape Town to San Francisco, they travel on board Lufthans a Cargo.

Wine from South Africa enjoys an excellent reputation around the world.

In recent years the high-quality wines from the Cape have positioned themselves as an independent category with the label “Wine of Origin”. What frequently distinguishes these wines is the fruity elegance of the whites, and how pleasant the full-bodied reds are after just a few years. Wine is a living, breathing product. A lengthy journey would alter the complex yet delicate flavours. For this reason, these noble wines from South Africa make their way around the globe by plane. The rainbow nation at the southern tip of Africa takes pride in its modern, quality-conscious wine-growing industry meanwhile covering an acreage of about 102,000 hectares. The history of Cape wine began as far back as 1655, when Dutch settlers planted the first vines on the slopes of Table Mountain on orders from the Dutch East India Company.

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The wine was intended as provisions for the company’s seafarers journeying between Europe and the East Indies – wine stays drinkable longer than water. While the first barrels were likely of dubious quality – those Dutch settlers were seafarers after all – the first governor of Cape Town, Jan van Riebeeck, did enter one euphoric note in his diary, on 2 February 1659: “Today, praise the Lord, wine was made from grapes grown in the Cape for the first time, and the young grape must was tasted straight from the barrel.” After the Dutch, the Huguenots arrived at the Cape of Good Hope. Along with them they brought their wine-making expertise and experience from France. One of the oldest and most famous wine-growing regions in South Africa is Stellenbosch, about 50 kilometers south of Cape Town.

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The region’s vineyards, over 120 in number, are renowned for the high-quality wine they export.

There is steady demand from around the globe – even from places as distant as San Francisco, some 16,500 kilometers away. Even though the Napa Valley, one of the main regions where grapes for Californian wine are cultivated, is located just outside the gates of the metropolis on the Pacific, many wine buffs still swear by the produce from the Cape of Good Hope. From the wine estates in the Stellenbosch region the wine is trucked over dusty tracks to Cape Town. At the Lufthansa Cargo warehouse at Cape Town International Airport (CPT), a special temperature-controlled place is set aside for this precious cargo at all times. Five days a week, a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600, flight number LH575, flies from South Africa to Munich, a trip of just under eleven-and-a-half hours – carrying the boxes of wine shipped as a td.Pro consignment. 

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At Franz Josef Strauss Airport, the exquisite cargo is then placed in the hold of an aircraft of the same type, this time on flight number LH458 to San Francisco (SFO). Another twelve and a half hours later, after a flight across the Atlantic, Iceland, Greenland and vast stretches of Canada, the boxes filled with bottles of wine reach their destination in California. Next is the mandatory inspection by customs and by the Food and Drug Administration, which is responsible for food safety in the United States. It would have taken the seafarers of the Dutch East India Company many months to complete such a long journey; thanks to the efficient Lufthansa Cargo network, the precious cargo from the Cape usually travels half-way around the world within a couple of days.


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Flying sand to the desert.

In Dubai, major buildings are emerging from the desert at great speed. On occasion, the sand used is flown in via td.Pro.

Dubai can hardly quench its thirst for sand.

At 828 meters, the Burj Khalifa is now the world’s tallest building in the Emirate of Dubai. An even higher one is planned. Expo 2020 in Dubai additionally reinforces the construction volume. The other Gulf States – such as Qatar, which is preparing for the Men’s 2022 World Cup – also rely on sand imports. The principle construction material for the skyscrapers is reinforced concrete – two thirds of which are sand. Some 450 million tons of sand were required for the aggregate on artificial islands such as The Palm Jumeirah, The Palm Jebel Ali and The World in the shape of palms or world maps on Dubai’s Persian Gulf coastline.

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This exhausted Dubai’s resources of sea sand, which is also suitable as a building material. Consumption of this raw material is increasing worldwide. The British geologist, Michael Welland, describes sand as the silent hero of our time. After air and water it is the resource most in demand worldwide. In addition to its function as a building aggregate, sand is essential as an element in many cosmetics, coastal protection and as a basic material in microchips in Smartphones and computers. According to a UN report, each year an unbelievable 30 billion tons of building minerals are consumed alone to produce concrete – the largest part of which is sand in its various forms and compositions. The 26 tons from Germany now on approach to Dubai mean the project can be finished on time after all.

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Work halted:

following an average in the Suez Canal, southbound vessels in the Mediterranean are queuing up. On board one of these freighters is one of the most coveted goods in the desert state Dubai – sand. And if it isn’t supplied to a major construction site quickly, work will be halted. For the major German construction company responsible for completing the work in the Emirate of Dubai amid tight deadlines and looming contractual penalties, such a situation is a nightmare. Although the start of the desert can be seen from the construction site – the golden sand is not suitable for construction projects. Thousands of years of winds have left the sand smooth and round. However, to bind concrete and aggregate, sand grains need corners, edges and a rough surface.

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And this quality can be found, for example, in Germany or Australia. A sand dealer near Cologne therefore takes a call: “We need 26 tons of sand in four days. In Dubai.” A timescale of three days – enough for the td.Pro standard solution to transport the sand from Frankfurt (FRA) to Dubai International Airport (DXB). First of all, it is packed in 25-kilogram sacks for transportation by truck. At the Lufthansa Cargo Center, the handling experts calculate the loading distribution and staple the sacks afresh: 90 on each cargo pallet. At 1.5 tons in weight per cubic meter, sand is a challenge for airfreight. Cargo pallets need to be distributed in the plane to maintain balance. Just 36 hours after the first call, the MD-11F takes off en route to Dubai.


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Redeployment.

Having been decommissioned at their original companies, many of Germany’s industrial machines are now headed for a new life in another country. With td.Pro entire printing presses can sometimes take flight.
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Things have gone quiet for the KBA Journal.

Until just four weeks ago, the web offset printing machine from Koenig & Bauer had printed news articles, photographs and small advertisements for the readers in a small town on the edge of Germany’s Ruhr region – and always at crisp, high resolution. Yet since the machine was built in the year 1996, the digital revolution has turned the world of print upside down, and not only that: new machines can do the job even more efficiently. The “new one” is already hard at work at the newly opened Media House. The good news is that even after innumerable kilometres of paper and countless hours of service, the KBA Journal is still a very long way from printing its last edition. Today the professionals from a company specializing in the dismantling and reassembly of large used machinery are moving in. Why? Because while these machines do not offer the very latest technical advances, they represent the ideal means of production especially for companies in emerging market countries, thanks to their high precision, the low cost of acquisition, and their long life expectancy.

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The print shop had placed an advertisement for the KBA Journal on the Internet. Before long a buyer was found in India: a print shop located in Delhi. The buyer commissioned a specialist company in Germany with the task of relocating the printing press. Working closely with the seller and with the experts from Lufthansa Cargo, these high-tech removal experts dismantle the KBA Journal in just a few days, and they will then reassemble and commission it again in Delhi. The removal company will also provide the staff at the print shop in India with the initial training. As for the mode of transport, Lufthansa Cargo’s td.Pro service was the clear choice for the principal in India – as a faster alternative to transport by sea.
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The modules of the printing press make their way from the Ruhr region to India mounted on stable wooden frames that were specially designed and built for this airfreight consignment by the removal firm, working in consultation with Lufthansa Cargo. “The wooden frames can be moved directly from the truck into the aircraft that will be flying to Indira Gandhi International Airport (DEL), all we need to do is lash them down,” says Arturo Staschik from Lufthansa Cargo in Frankfurt (FRA), the man in charge of organizing the flight and shipment. “Had it gone by sea inside a container, a large number of expensive, specially designed crates would have had to be built. For airfreight, all that is needed is a transport frame that can be lashed down in the cargo hold. The killer argument in this case, however, is the short transit time. 

Whereas the journey by sea from Hamburg to Mumbai would have taken more than 30 days, the Lufthansa Cargo plane can fly to Delhi directly. Which means the first issue printed by the KBA Journal will be published four weeks sooner. In addition, this mode of transport is gentler on the cargo: the roads on the more than 1,400-kilometer route overland from Mumbai to Delhi are not always perfect and could damage the components. “With used machinery in particular, it is important that everything arrives intact. Replacement parts often have to be manufactured as one-offs, which is expensive and takes time,” says Staschik.

 

And additional costs are something the people at the print shop in Delhi can ill afford: they need to focus on other things. The print shop is part of an Indian media company that is trying to establish a place for confident journalism in India’s booming yet not always innocuous media landscape. It is an endeavor that calls for intelligent and courageous minds and a great deal of enthusiasm – and a tried and tested KBA Journal, ready to start a new and exciting chapter in its life.