Asset Publisher

Story Image

Always state of the art - our ARTcube Frankfurt

In June, 2022 we opened our new Fine Arts warehouse facility at the Frankfurt Hub. With 155 square meters, the ARTcube in the Lufthansa Cargo Center now offers our customers twice as much space for safe and professional storage of high-value Fine Arts of all kinds.

"The modern ARTcube combines optimal handling processes with the highest security features. This allows us to meet the special requirements of sensitive art objects and offer customized solutions for the storage of Fine Arts in our Hub," explains Thomas Rohrmeier, Head of Handling Frankfurt. "With the new building, we have further sharpened our qualitative focus on this special product and thus curators and art collectors experience the best storage conditions for their Fine Arts shipments with us."

Story Image

Fine Arts shipments will in future benefit from a special warehouse with modern technical equipment, in which a ventilation system with heating and cooling functions enables targeted temperature control. Vertical window strips on the facade allow natural lighting, which is optimized by a supporting lighting system. Specially trained handling personnel guarantee optimally coordinated processes. Access to the special warehouse is controlled and monitored by sensitive security technology. As an Add-on Service, it is possible to book an individual attendant for Fine Arts shipments, especially on the ground.

Lufthansa Cargo regularly flies high-value and famous Fine Arts by important artists to renowned exhibitions around the world. With its "Vulnerables" product range, the airline has therefore tailored a special transport solution to the needs of this particular industry, thus guaranteeing security, professional handling and seamless monitoring for Fine Arts logistics.



The new construction of this special warehouse is part of the modularly planned infrastructure program "LCCevolution" at the Frankfurt home Hub, the core of which includes, among other things, the new construction of the central high-rack storage system in the Lufthansa Cargo Center and a gradual core refurbishment of the logistics infrastructure. The complete modernization of the Lufthansa Cargo Center is scheduled for completion in 2029.

Story Image

Zero defect tolerance

“All of our shipments are very time-sensitive and require zero defect tolerance in the handling of Dangerous Goods throughout the entire supply chain. Therefore, we need a strong partner and trust in Lufthansa Cargo.“

Anna Hutter, Deputy Commercial Director, Institute of Isotopes Co., Hungary.

The Institute of Isotopes Co. Ltd. plays an important role on the frontline of radioisotope technology. Their experience dates back to 1971 when they took their first steps in radiopharmaceutical production. Since then, the company has evolved as an expert in manufacturing radiopharmaceutical products for nuclear medicine professionals to help recover patients worldwide.

"Not only do we ship our life-saving medicines all over the world, but we also use dangerous goods airfreight services to transport our organic composites used for pharmacological bioactive compounds. These substances are very time-critical and require optimal reliability under the strictest safety requirements throughout the supply chain. Lufthansa Cargo offers exactly that. We are very happy to have such a strong and trustworthy partner," says Anna Hutter, Deputy Commercial Director of the Institute of Isotopes Co. Ltd. in Hungary.

Lufthansa Cargo is pleased about the cooperation and looks forward to helping to bring these life-saving shipments to the world.

The Institute of Isotopes Co. Ltd. plays an important role on the frontline of radioisotope technology. Their experience dates back to 1971 when they took their first steps in radiopharmaceutical production. Since then, the company has evolved as an expert in manufacturing radiopharmaceutical products for nuclear medicine professionals to help recover patients worldwide.

"Not only do we ship our life-saving medicines all over the world, but we also use dangerous goods airfreight services to transport our organic composites used for pharmacological bioactive compounds. These substances are very time-critical and require optimal reliability under the strictest safety requirements throughout the supply chain. Lufthansa Cargo offers exactly that. We are very happy to have such a strong and trustworthy partner," says Anna Hutter, Deputy Commercial Director of the Institute of Isotopes Co. Ltd. in Hungary.

Lufthansa Cargo is pleased about the cooperation and looks forward to helping to bring these life-saving shipments to the world.

Story Image

Viet Nam - small country with big future

Vietnam not only has a lot to offer in terms of scenery. The Southeast Asian country is an emerging market with enormous potential. As a booming manufacturing hub, Vietnam showed its resilience and growth strength during the pandemic. Particularly in the manufacturing sector, Vietnam is becoming increasingly important globally and has seen the highest growth in this sector in recent years. Foreign investment has almost doubled in the last decade. The most important ones come from Asia and Europe.

The share of Vietnam's GDP in the world GDP has doubled within the last ten years (from : 0.2% in 2011 to 0.4% in 2021). In this context, foreign trade is one of the most important economic drivers. Of Vietnam's total exports, 29% go to the US and 12% to the EU. The most important export goods are electronics and textiles/fashion - goods for which air freight plays a major role. Sustained economic development is expected to promise significant air freight growth in the coming years, further increasing demand for air freight. The boom in e-commerce is also contributing to an increase in demand in Vietnam.

We at Lufthansa Cargo, we are well prepared to expand the supply of air cargo capacity in the Vietnamese market and to Asia.

On Asian routes alone, there are 38 weekly connections to attractive destinations to choose from. NEW to the schedule is the destination Hanoi (HAN). The capital will be served twice a week from Frankfurt from the beginning of November - with an eastbound stopover in Mumbai/India. We already flies twice weekly from Frankfurt via Bangkok (BKK) to Ho Chi Minh City (SGN), thus doubling our presence in Vietnam.

Story Image

“Swiftly to destinations worldwide.”

One in four of the world’s beverage bottles are manufactured or filled using machinery from Krones. The Bavaria based company relies on td.Flash for the fast global transportation of the components and spare parts required for its equipment.

Bottles rush loudly and at full speed along the conveyor belts. Labels are attached one after the other in rapid succession.

The machines from Krones manage up to 80,000 bottles an hour – in Tibet at an altitude of 5,000 meters, in Mongolia, in the USA or during the World Cup in Brazil.

But when this high-precision process is brought to a standstill by an error message and no more beer bottles or soft drinks are able to leave to plant, that’s when the phone rings in Neutraubling, southeast of Regensburg. The facility in the Upper Palatinate is the headquarters of Krones AG. In addition to complete machines, the plant manufactures spare parts and retrofits, which keep the Krones machinery going at all times at beverages companies all over the world.

Story Image

So it’s important that we invest in new freighters such as the Boeing 777F in order to be able to transport higher volumes,” says Karin Prasch, Krones’ contact person and Head of Sales, Nuremberg at Lufthansa Cargo. “In addition, our special td.Flash operation teams take care of express shipments in the transit zone,” she adds. “Of course, we also exchange ideas with our product developers on how to organize solutions such as td.Flash even more efficiently,” Prasch explains.

Story Image

Apart from the capacity guarantee, Krones also benefits from the td.Flash policy of accepting shipments up until 90 minutes before scheduled take-off: “This gives us a little more time to produce the part required and to hand it over to the airline or to the forwarder on the same day,” says Raab. Being able to pick up the shipment just two hours after landing also accelerates the processes on the destination side.

Yet even the best express solution is worthless if the aircraft do not land where the material is required: “We have tested other airlines’ express services, but Lufthansa Cargo’s close-meshed destination network has proven to be the best for us,” says Raab. Krones’ six other Life Cycle Service (LCS) Centers alongside the one in Neutraubling are located in Brazil, the USA, China, South Africa, Thailand and Russia. The five main destinations over which the machinery manufacturer ships most of its cargo are Chicago, São Paulo, Bangkok and Lagos from Munich, and Shanghai from Frankfurt.

Story Image

Even though it can never be predicted with absolute certainty in the special machinery manufacturing segment where the next shipment will be going, there are identifiable cycles in the global beverages industry: “The demand of our key-account customers very much depends on mega-trends such as economic growth and on mega-events such as the World Cup in Brazil or the Olympics. Let’s see what comes up next,” says Raab, looking ahead optimistically.

For no matter what challenges await Krones in future, the reliable express solution via td.Flash and Lufthansa Cargo is ready to handle it with perfection.

www.krones.com

Story Image

Direct Ramp.

Markus Rudolph actually just came to the Lufthansa Cargo Center in Frankfurt to get some photos taken of his newest truck in an airport setting. But then Ramona Pieper approached the air cargo trucking operator holding Lufthansa Cargo’s Quality Q, now so familiar throughout the industry. 

Rudolph’s truck, an impressive black Mercedes-Benz Actros, was the perfect backdrop for putting her message in the picture. Following the suggestion of Pieper and her team, Lufthansa Cargo has been working on an IT-based ramp and slot management system for the control of landside customer and system transport since the beginning of 2013.

Trucking competence: truck forwarder Markus Rudolph in the outgoing allocation area in Frankfurt with one of his 35 road feeder service trucks.

Story Image

It is one of the few airlines worldwide to do so. “Direct Ramp” provides customers with delivery or pick-up slots so that all processes can be perfectly prepared and the waiting times for the trucks at the ramps can be shortened. Forwarder Markus Rudolph is also pleased about this improvement in quality and immediately agreed to an interview with the planet film team for the magazine’s app edition on his experiences as an air cargo trucker.

Quality improvement: the team led by Ramona Pieper, shown here in the truck holding a Lufthansa Cargo Q, has launched a new IT-based ramp and slot management system. It improves the control of landside customer and system transport.

Clear vote.
The Munich ifo Institute analyzed over 6,800 answers given by German companies for the calculation of its Business Climate Index. The result: 73 percent of the industrial enterprises described air transport as “important” or even “very important”. In particular the segments with above-average growth rely on first-class air transport connections. These include the mechanical engineering, pharmaceutical and automobile sectors. The survey related to passenger transport as well as air cargo. In Germany, airfreight accounts for only two percent of imported and exported tonnage, but 30 percent of imported and exported values. This corresponds to roughly 204 billion euros per year. Despite the paramount importance of air transport for the success of the “export world champion” Germany, the industry is confronted with an extremely tough economic environment. In this context the German Air Transport Industry Association (BDL) has criticized the air traffic tax, the restrictive night-flight regulations and emissions trading.
 
“How important is air transport for your company?” 
This was what the Ifo Institute asked companies in three key industrial sectors of the export world champion Germany. The result: Germany’s industry needs air transport
 
89,6 % Mechanical engineering
 
85,9 % Pharmaceutical industry
 
79,6 % Automobile production
 
4th Security Conference.
There was an impressive response throughout the industry to this year’s Lufthansa Cargo Security Conference. Experts from numerous European countries and from all industrial sectors flocked to the Commerzbank Arena in Frankfurt to exchange ideas on the latest developments, which included solutions in response to the ACC3 regulations for cargo from third countries outside the EU and the USA. Keynote speaker was Wolfgang Ischinger, Chair of the Munich Security Conference, who addressed the conference participants about the international security situation and its impact on supply chains worldwide.
 
cd.Solutions USA.
Lufthansa Cargo now also offers its special product cd.Solutions for To-Door shipments to the USA. These shipments can be delivered to more than 30 cities via the gateways Atlanta, New York City and Chicago. cd.Solutions for imports to Germany and to the rest of Europe has already been available for a decade. The direct delivery saves time and money and gives customers the certainty of an optimally planned logistics chain. The USA is Lufthansa Cargo’s second biggest market and the road feeder services network has been extremely broad-based for years.
 
Double distinction.
The future-strategy program “Lufthansa Cargo 2020” wins over the logistics industry: at the prestigious Air Cargo Excellence Awards Lufthansa Cargo received the Platinum Award in the frame­work of the World Cargo Symposiums 2014 in Los Angeles and scored highly in numerous categories. In ­addition, the American logistics service provider Expeditors International acknowledged Lufthansa Cargo’s performance with their 2013 Award of Excellence. Lufthansa Cargo has begun consolidating and extending its leading role in the industry with multi-billion euro ­investments in the future of its airfreight business. The five brand-new Boeing 777 Freighters, three of which have already been put into service, are the most visible sign of this strategy for the future. IT investments, the increasing digitalization of all airfreight documents and the new logistics center at the Frankfurt hub are also contributing considerably to this development.
 
Cargo world as app.
Experience the world of Lufthansa Cargo as an app. A new app is now available for customers and anyone else who is interested. Following the Tracking App and the planet App, the new Corporate App invites you to discover the world of the cargo airline with the crane emblem. The Corporate App can be downloaded free on the iTunes Store and on Google Play.
 
 
Photos:
Matthias Aletsee

Clear vote.
The Munich ifo Institute analyzed over 6,800 answers given by German companies for the calculation of its Business Climate Index. The result: 73 percent of the industrial enterprises described air transport as “important” or even “very important”. In particular the segments with above-average growth rely on first-class air transport connections. These include the mechanical engineering, pharmaceutical and automobile sectors. The survey related to passenger transport as well as air cargo. In Germany, airfreight accounts for only two percent of imported and exported tonnage, but 30 percent of imported and exported values. This corresponds to roughly 204 billion euros per year. Despite the paramount importance of air transport for the success of the “export world champion” Germany, the industry is confronted with an extremely tough economic environment. In this context the German Air Transport Industry Association (BDL) has criticized the air traffic tax, the restrictive night-flight regulations and emissions trading.

“How important is air transport for your company?” 
This was what the Ifo Institute asked companies in three key industrial sectors of the export world champion Germany. The result: Germany’s industry needs air transport

89,6 % Mechanical engineering

85,9 % Pharmaceutical industry

79,6 % Automobile production

4th Security Conference.
There was an impressive response throughout the industry to this year’s Lufthansa Cargo Security Conference. Experts from numerous European countries and from all industrial sectors flocked to the Commerzbank Arena in Frankfurt to exchange ideas on the latest developments, which included solutions in response to the ACC3 regulations for cargo from third countries outside the EU and the USA. Keynote speaker was Wolfgang Ischinger, Chair of the Munich Security Conference, who addressed the conference participants about the international security situation and its impact on supply chains worldwide.

cd.Solutions USA.
Lufthansa Cargo now also offers its special product cd.Solutions for To-Door shipments to the USA. These shipments can be delivered to more than 30 cities via the gateways Atlanta, New York City and Chicago. cd.Solutions for imports to Germany and to the rest of Europe has already been available for a decade. The direct delivery saves time and money and gives customers the certainty of an optimally planned logistics chain. The USA is Lufthansa Cargo’s second biggest market and the road feeder services network has been extremely broad-based for years.

Double distinction.
The future-strategy program “Lufthansa Cargo 2020” wins over the logistics industry: at the prestigious Air Cargo Excellence Awards Lufthansa Cargo received the Platinum Award in the frame­work of the World Cargo Symposiums 2014 in Los Angeles and scored highly in numerous categories. In ­addition, the American logistics service provider Expeditors International acknowledged Lufthansa Cargo’s performance with their 2013 Award of Excellence. Lufthansa Cargo has begun consolidating and extending its leading role in the industry with multi-billion euro ­investments in the future of its airfreight business. The five brand-new Boeing 777 Freighters, three of which have already been put into service, are the most visible sign of this strategy for the future. IT investments, the increasing digitalization of all airfreight documents and the new logistics center at the Frankfurt hub are also contributing considerably to this development.

Cargo world as app.
Experience the world of Lufthansa Cargo as an app. A new app is now available for customers and anyone else who is interested. Following the Tracking App and the planet App, the new Corporate App invites you to discover the world of the cargo airline with the crane emblem. The Corporate App can be downloaded free on the iTunes Store and on Google Play.

 

 

Photos:

Matthias Aletsee

Story Image

Cold start!

The pharma business is a growing industry that makes high quality demands on logistics service providers. In this segment, Dachser has built up know-how and intends to gain further shares of the market – also through collaboration with Lufthansa Cargo.

Story Image

Christoph Honermann is responsible for the development of the life sciences segment at Dachser Air & Sea Logistics. “By 2015, pharmaceuticals patents with an estimated value of 150 billion U.S. dollars will have expired,” he says. When patent protection ends, these medicines will compete directly with the less expensive generic products. As there will be an ever greater demand for generics in newly industrializing countries in particular, the volume of transportation from the manufacturing countries will increase.

Generics are not the only reason why the pharmaceutical industry, whose high-value products are often transported as airfreight, is growing and why increasing transportation volumes are to be expected. Almost everywhere, per capita expenses for medicines are steadily rising, new therapies are constantly being developed and a growing number of people worldwide have access to health facilities.

Story Image

“In the U.S., annual per capita pharmaceuticals spending is over 850 U.S. dollars. In India, on the other hand, the corresponding figure is less than ten U.S. dollars. This shows how much catching up some countries have to do,” explains Christopher Dehio, Senior Manager Global Key Accounts Temperature Control at Lufthansa Cargo. Dachser can already look back on several decades of experience with pharma transportation.

The decision to establish life sciences as one of the five specific vertical markets, however, was only taken two years ago. In the company’s global expansion strategy, the greater structuring of the business segments facilitates process standardizations and knowledge management, which is indispensable for complex logistics products. Furthermore, it also becomes clear for outsiders that Dachser is ready to meet the specific requirements of pharma transportation.

“For us as a logistics service provider, it is important that we adapt to the needs of our customers and offer high-quality solutions that are reliable and repeatable,” says Honermann. Under the umbrella of life sciences, Dachser differentiates five product groups: original pharmaceuticals, generics, biotech, medical technology and diagnostics. The various products often make very specific demands on transportation. Numerous active ingredients are more complex and more sensitive today than just a few years ago.

“For many medicines, temperature control is the most critical element. In addition, extensive security measures have to be taken in the case of narcotics or products with a very high value,” Honermann says. Dachser meticulously ensures that only absolutely reliable partners are entrusted with transportation and handling along the transport chain.

 

Story Image

“Lufthansa Cargo has the knowledge and the experience. That enables highly productive collaboration,” says Honermann. Dachser Air & Sea Logistics is currently active in 30 countries. The life sciences segment is to be introduced with uniform quality standards in nine markets by the end of the year. Each of these markets has to undergo a roll-out procedure. The specific conditions and regulations of the respective country have to be taken into account.

Branch office and handling employees are given instruction and multipliers take part in Dachser Academy training. Finally, Envirotainer accredits that the logistics company is qualified to handle transportation in cool containers in compliance with Good Distribution Practice guidelines.

Story Image

Professionally cooled in over 100 countries.

With its extensive network of stations, Lufthansa Cargo can handle temperature-sensitive shipments professionally all over the world. The products and services offered by the cargo airline in the field of refrigerated transportation are subsumed under the name Cool/td. Dachser and Lufthansa Cargo work together worldwide as global partners. A large part of the Dachser pharma shipments at Frankfurt Airport, for example, also pass through the Lufthansa Cargo Cool Center (LCCC). It has the necessary infrastructure as well as qualified staff. “Only part of what we need from a carrier in pharma logistics takes place in the air. Substantial sections of the door-to-door cool chain are handled on the ground,” explains Honermann.

The LCCC at Frankfurt Airport has storage rooms with varying ­controlled temperature ranges, from -40° to +25°. In addition, all the receptacles and packaging materials that are usually used for passive and actively cooled shipments are handled there.

Digital temperature gauges located throughout the LCCC monitor the temperature profile. Loaded pallets with silver insulating foil are made ready for transportation and forklift trucks bring the cool container types Unicooler and Opticooler for loading. 

“The shipments all leave with sensors attached to them so as to prove compliance with the acceptable temperature range,” explains Christopher Dehio. Honermann and Dehio agree that the pressure of costs in the industry will increase. Sea freight will become more important for medicines that have a longer product life. The volume of transportation, however, is not expected to decline. “The pressure of the market strengthens our conviction that we must cooperate with partners with whom absolutely efficient collaboration is possible,” says Honermann.

www.dachser.com

Photos:

Ralf Kreuels

Story Image

If in doubt, no compromises.

The book is a sizeable tome: 910 pages in DIN A4 format. In this one publication, the International Air Transport Association (IATA) lists what must be observed when transporting dangerous goods in aircraft. “This thing here,” says Rainer Gross, looking at the set of rules five centimeters thick, “is my bible.” The “Dangerous Goods Regulations” (DGR) meticulously specify which substances and chemicals are classified as dangerous for transportation by air and how they must be packaged, labeled and loaded. The DGR are subdivided into nine hazard classes. They include explosive, flammable, toxic and corrosive substances. That radioactive material is classified in the DGR was to be expected. But some people will be surprised to discover that hairspray, automobile airbags, towelettes, hydrogen peroxide, which is used to dye hair blond, and an ordinary fire extinguisher are also on the list of dangerous goods.

What is viewed as dangerous sometimes varies from one country to the next. In the U.S., for example, lithium-metal batteries are only allowed to be transported in cargo aircraft and not in the cargo holds of passenger airliners. In Germany, on the other hand, the transportation of these button cells, which are often used in watches and cameras, is permitted on board passenger aircraft – providing the quantity does not exceed five kilograms per package. If it does, the stipulation here too is: cargo aircraft only!
 
“We don’t accept any compromises”
 
What is allowed to be transported in an aircraft and how this cargo has to be packaged is a science in itself. The IATA set of rules requires 144 pages alone on blue paper to list all relevant dangerous goods. The packaging regulations are even more extensive. It is outlined on yellow paper between pages 353 and 552 how which product must be packaged – whether in crates, barrels or canisters and which materials are to be used when doing so.
 
The latter range from cardboard and wood to plastic and steel. Sometimes, composite packaging is required. Each substance is assigned “its” specific packaging. “We don’t accept any compromises,” emphasizes Rainer Gross, one of 18 specialists for dangerous goods at Lufthansa Cargo’s hub in Frankfurt: “Safety has top priority. That is in the interest of the manufacturers, the forwarders and, last but not least, the airlines.” In a separate depot for dangerous goods, Rainer Gross inspects each of the 85 barrels with printing inks, which are today scheduled to be flown from Frankfurt to Johannesburg.
 
Do they have dents, are they damaged or are there any leaks? A few meters further along, he then checks cartons containing batteries for China: the boxes dance through his hands. For seconds his eyes are fixated on each of the six sides. The maxim of the dangerous goods specialist is: every carton has six sides and every side could be damaged. So every side is examined.
 
“All shipments,” says Gross, “are checked physically and in a documentary form for completeness, intactness and proper labeling. The data in the air waybill and the shipper’s declaration for dangerous goods must also tally.” If the Lufthansa specialists discover security-relevant damage to the cargo or inconsistencies in the documentation and marking of the packages, there are no compromises. The consignor must rectify the situation. Otherwise, the cargo is not taken on board.
 
“What may at first glance seem to be ‘red tape’ is in fact our uncompromising safety philosophy,” stresses Gross. This pays off. The DGR specialist cannot recall “when we have had any problems with dangerous goods on board a Lufthansa aircraft”.
 
With globalization the business with dangerous goods is booming for Lufthansa Cargo. Last year, approximately 47,000 tons were flown. In the current year, this figure will probably be higher. Whether special chemicals, paints, fertilizer, radioactive isotopes for cancer therapy at university clinics or airbags and belt tensioners for the automobile industry – the list of shipments classified as dangerous goods is long. Nevertheless, says Rainer Gross, the risk remains manageable: “If the shipment has been properly declared, documented and packaged in accordance with IATA requirements, there are no problems.” He and his 17 colleagues make sure of that.
 
Photos:
Stefan Wildhirt

What is viewed as dangerous sometimes varies from one country to the next. In the U.S., for example, lithium-metal batteries are only allowed to be transported in cargo aircraft and not in the cargo holds of passenger airliners.

In Germany, on the other hand, the transportation of these button cells, which are often used in watches and cameras, is permitted on board passenger aircraft – providing the quantity does not exceed five kilograms per package. If it does, the stipulation here too is: cargo aircraft only!

“We don’t accept any compromises”

What is allowed to be transported in an aircraft and how this cargo has to be packaged is a science in itself. The IATA set of rules requires 144 pages alone on blue paper to list all relevant dangerous goods. The packaging regulations are even more extensive. It is outlined on yellow paper between pages 353 and 552 how which product must be packaged – whether in crates, barrels or canisters and which materials are to be used when doing so.

The latter range from cardboard and wood to plastic and steel. Sometimes, composite packaging is required. Each substance is assigned “its” specific packaging. “We don’t accept any compromises,” emphasizes Rainer Gross, one of 18 specialists for dangerous goods at Lufthansa Cargo’s hub in Frankfurt: “Safety has top priority.

That is in the interest of the manufacturers, the forwarders and, last but not least, the airlines.” In a separate depot for dangerous goods, Rainer Gross inspects each of the 85 barrels with printing inks, which are today scheduled to be flown from Frankfurt to Johannesburg.

Do they have dents, are they damaged or are there any leaks?

A few meters further along, he then checks cartons containing batteries for China: the boxes dance through his hands. For seconds his eyes are fixated on each of the six sides. The maxim of the dangerous goods specialist is: every carton has six sides and every side could be damaged. So every side is examined.

“All shipments,” says Gross, “are checked physically and in a documentary form for completeness, intactness and proper labeling. The data in the air waybill and the shipper’s declaration for dangerous goods must also tally.” If the Lufthansa specialists discover security-relevant damage to the cargo or inconsistencies in the documentation and marking of the packages, there are no compromises. The consignor must rectify the situation. Otherwise, the cargo is not taken on board.

“What may at first glance seem to be ‘red tape’ is in fact our uncompromising safety philosophy,” stresses Gross. This pays off. The DGR specialist cannot recall “when we have had any problems with dangerous goods on board a Lufthansa aircraft”.

With globalization the business with dangerous goods is booming for Lufthansa Cargo. Last year, approximately 47,000 tons were flown. In the current year, this figure will probably be higher. Whether special chemicals, paints, fertilizer, radioactive isotopes for cancer therapy at university clinics or airbags and belt tensioners for the automobile industry – the list of shipments classified as dangerous goods is long. Nevertheless, says Rainer Gross, the risk remains manageable: “If the shipment has been properly declared, documented and packaged in accordance with IATA requirements, there are no problems.” He and his 17 colleagues make sure of that.

 

Photos:

Stefan Wildhirt

Story Image

The value of the rose.

Fairly traded flowers: Lufthansa Cargo flies them for the importer Omniflora from East Africa to Frankfurt – and thus over an enormous distance. The climate balance is astonishingly good.

The red Furiosa or preferably the Athena in white? Or both, and a whole lot of varieties more? Omniflora has hundreds of different premium roses in its range. The company from Neu-Isenburg near Frankfurt primarily supplies big chains, but also wholesalers. The flowers come from Kenya and Tanzania in East Africa. Almost all of them are Fairtrade products.

Story Image

From Kenya’s capital Nairobi a substantial number of the roses are transported to Germany in MD-11 freighters from Lufthansa Cargo. “We prefer to load with Lufthansa Cargo,” says Omniflora Managing Director Klaus W. Voss.

“There are currently five flights per week from Nairobi to Frankfurt, and we have goods on board each one.” Last year, the company that was established in 1994 and now has 75 employees imported approximately 4,300 tons of flowers from East Africa. 

With an upward trend:

The tonnage has increased by between 10 to 20 percent respectively over the past two years. The flight from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport to Frankfurt takes about eight hours. During this time – and also during truck transportation from the farms to Nairobi – the sensitive goods are stored in special airfreight boxes. “Precooled in an extensive process, they are thus well conditioned for transportation,” explains Voss.

The part of the supply chain that is organized on land is also optimized down to the last detail.

The Omniflora sister company Skytrain is responsible on the African side. “The loading in Nairobi takes about four hours,” says Voss. At this point in time, the flowers are matured and already have the right color, but are still closed. Immediately after landing in Frankfurt the cargo is transported to Omniflora’s nearby Freshness Center.

The employees at this facility remove the flowers from the airfreight boxes, cut them and load them – in buckets with precooled water and special freshness retaining substances – on what are known as CC trolleys or in boxes on pallets. The goods are then ready for truck transportation. In addition to German buyers, the company delivers the flowers to customers in Austria, Switzerland and Scandinavia. “We have our own refrigerated trucks, but we also work together with a forwarder. The trips take 12 to 24 hours,” says the company founder.

A lot of time and effort to transport cut flowers that also grow in Germany.

Nevertheless, importing them over distances of several thousands kilometers does make ecological sense, as Voss explains: anyone who intends growing roses in Germany for trade on a large scale has to provide them with artificial heat and lighting in greenhouses. “That requires a lot of energy.”

In Kenya and Tanzania this is almost completely provided by the sun.

“That’s why the CO2 emissions when growing in East Africa are only one seventh of the amount that would be generated in Germany. And nota bene: the transportation has already been taken into account in this figure,” Voss points out. In many cases, the farmers carry out pest control in accordance with the guidelines of Integrated Pest Management: they let beneficial organisms do the work that would have otherwise required chemicals.

The flowers are grown by about 20 producers.

Roughly a quarter of these enterprises belong to James Finlay Limited, the parent company of Omniflora. Trade is carried out with the farms on the basis of the rules of the Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (FLO). This gives the farmers the certainty that their products will be purchased at an appropriate, fixed price. “That price is always firmly agreed for one year,” says Voss.

“On the normal market, flowers are auctioned, the price fluctuations are enormous.” 

Furthermore, in the framework of the Fairtrade agreement a premium is disbursed amounting to ten percent of the “free on board” value. “That is the value that the flower has when it leaves the farm.” The premium goes to projects, which are selected by the employee council of the farm. This way, local hospitals and schools can be supported, or money is channeled into small loans for farm workers.

“Through our flowers we generate Fairtrade premiums of 1.5 million euros per year,” says Voss. A fact that has definitely not gone unnoticed by the organization: in 2010, Omniflora won the “Fairtrade Award” in the  “Commerce/Industry” category of the acknowledged organization “FairtradeDeutschland”.

www.omniflora.com

Photos:

Kai Hartmann

With an upward trend:

The tonnage has increased by between 10 to 20 percent respectively over the past two years. The flight from Jomo Kenyatta International Airport to Frankfurt takes about eight hours. During this time – and also during truck transportation from the farms to Nairobi – the sensitive goods are stored in special airfreight boxes. “Precooled in an extensive process, they are thus well conditioned for transportation,” explains Voss. 

The part of the supply chain that is organized on land is also optimized down to the last detail.

The Omniflora sister company Skytrain is responsible on the African side. “The loading in Nairobi takes about four hours,” says Voss. At this point in time, the flowers are matured and already have the right color, but are still closed. Immediately after landing in Frankfurt the cargo is transported to Omniflora’s nearby Freshness Center. 

The employees at this facility remove the flowers from the airfreight boxes, cut them and load them – in buckets with precooled water and special freshness retaining substances – on what are known as CC trolleys or in boxes on pallets. The goods are then ready for truck transportation. In addition to German buyers, the company delivers the flowers to customers in Austria, Switzerland and Scandinavia. “We have our own refrigerated trucks, but we also work together with a forwarder. The trips take 12 to 24 hours,” says the company founder.

A lot of time and effort to transport cut flowers that also grow in Germany.

Nevertheless, importing them over distances of several thousands kilometers does make ecological sense, as Voss explains: anyone who intends growing roses in Germany for trade on a large scale has to provide them with artificial heat and lighting in greenhouses. “That requires a lot of energy.”

In Kenya and Tanzania this is almost completely provided by the sun.

“That’s why the CO2 emissions when growing in East Africa are only one seventh of the amount that would be generated in Germany. And nota bene: the transportation has already been taken into account in this figure,” Voss points out. In many cases, the farmers carry out pest control in accordance with the guidelines of Integrated Pest Management: they let beneficial organisms do the work that would have otherwise required chemicals. 

The flowers are grown by about 20 producers.

Roughly a quarter of these enterprises belong to James Finlay Limited, the parent company of Omniflora. Trade is carried out with the farms on the basis of the rules of the Fairtrade Labelling Organizations International (FLO). This gives the farmers the certainty that their products will be purchased at an appropriate, fixed price. “That price is always firmly agreed for one year,” says Voss. 

“On the normal market, flowers are auctioned, the price fluctuations are enormous.”

Furthermore, in the framework of the Fairtrade agreement a premium is disbursed amounting to ten percent of the “free on board” value. “That is the value that the flower has when it leaves the farm.” The premium goes to projects, which are selected by the employee council of the farm. This way, local hospitals and schools can be supported, or money is channeled into small loans for farm workers. 

“Through our flowers we generate Fairtrade premiums of 1.5 million euros per year,” says Voss. A fact that has definitely not gone unnoticed by the organization: in 2010, Omniflora won the “Fairtrade Award” in the  “Commerce/Industry” category of the acknowledged organization “FairtradeDeutschland”.

www.omniflora.com

 

Photos:

Kai Hartmann

Story Image

Cool ­connection.

India accounts for a large part of the world’s generics ­production. One of the leading manufacturers is Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories from the pharmaceuticals hub Hyderabad. For years, the company has entrusted Lufthansa Cargo with the transportation of temperatursensitive freight.

Neon tubes bathe the hall in icy light. The temperature reading of 20.1 degrees Celsius on the digital thermometer is not exactly Arctic. The outside temperature at Hyderabad Airport in the Indian state of Andhra Pradesh, however, is over 37 degrees. Compared to that, the Pharma Zone reserved exclusively for medicines seems downright cool. 

It is even more important that exactly the right conditions prevail in the hall for freight such as the total of 2.4 metric tons of capsules stored loosely in blue receptacles. Intended for use for patients with gastrointestinal problems, they must have an ambient temperature of between 15 and 25 degrees at all times. Only then is their full efficacy guaranteed. In a few hours’ time, the capsules will be loaded onto an MD-11 from Lufthansa Cargo as part of a shipment weighing 80 metric tons. A transport container will then ensure the correct and constant temperature: the Unicooler.

The capsules in the blue buckets come from the manufacturer Dr. Reddy’s Laboratories.

They will be flown in the MD-11 to Frankfurt for onward transportation from there to other destinations in Europe and in the U.S. Like many other companies in this industry, Dr. Reddy’s is headquartered just a few dozen kilometers from the airport. Hyderabad with its many million inhabitants ranks as India’s pharmaceuticals capital. With a revenue of two billion U.S. dollars (approximately 1.6 billion euros) in the financial year 2012, Dr. Reddy’s is one of the subcontinent’s biggest pharmaceutical companies. At the same time, it is one of the world’s most important manufacturers of generics. Global business with the equivalent of branded medicines, which are more affordable and have the same active ingredients as the branded originals, following the expiry of patent protection is booming. Indian suppliers in particular benefit from the growing demand in newly industrializing and developing countries but also in industrialized countries.

Story Image

U.S., India and Germany in the focus of generics suppliers.

“Our key markets are the U.S., Russia, Germany, the UK and India,” says Dr. Ravi Prakash Mathur, who is responsible at Dr. Reddy’s for supply chain management and logistics. A focus in the company’s portfolio is on gastrointestinal and cardiovascular medicines as well as on diabetology and oncology.

Branded as well as no-name products are sold. Founded by Dr. Kallam Anji Reddy in 1984, the company today has about 15,000 employees, two thirds of whom are in India. Other manufacturing facilities are located in, among other places, Mexico and the U.S. 

Story Image

Dr. Reddy’s is represented in Germany by Betapharm Arzneimittel GmbH, which it acquired in 2006. In addition, the Indian company group and the German pharmaceuticals group Merck announced this year that they intend jointly developing what are known as biosimilars. “International revenues account for more than 80 percent of our business,” says Dr. Mathur. It is decisively important for the manufacturer therefore that the transportation of exports by air runs smoothly.

Story Image

Ideal transport equipment: Unicooler and Opticooler.

Lufthansa Cargo makes exactly the right transport equipment available to ensure that this is done reliably: the gastrointestinal capsules and many other temperature-sensitive products are sent on their airborne journey in the Unicooler.

The temperature inside the freight container can be set at values between -20 to +30 degrees Celsius. An autonomous cooling system keeps the settings constant at all times. Neither heat of almost 40 degrees, as during the meeting with Dr. Mathur in Hyderabad, nor minus temperatures at any other location can have an adverse impact on the goods.

In addition, a further development is available in the form of the Opticooler. Instead of dry ice, the cooling system here uses ­compressors. Both container variants are used in the framework of the product Cool/td-Active.

Lufthansa Cargo can also rely on state-of-the-art infrastructure at the airport of the “pharma city” Hyderabad, via which Dr. Reddy’s has a substantial share of its exports shipped. The cargo area has only existed in its current form since 2008, and the Pharma Zone was first opened in 2011. Goods from around 20 medicines manufacturers are regularly handled here. In addition to the area for 15- to 25-degree products such as the gastrointestinal capsules, there is one for even more sensitive products, which have to stored and transported at temperatures between two and eight degrees Celsius. What is more, there is a sterile zone for each category.

 

Dr. Reddy’s is a key customer.

“Inside India, Dr. Reddy’s is one of our key customers,” says Lufthansa Cargo manager Koppireddy Venugopal Raju, who is responsible there for this company. “And here in Hyderabad in particular, Dr. Reddy’s is the biggest customer in terms of tonnage.” In 2011, a total of about 1,500 metric tons was transported for the manufacturer, and there has been an upward trend year on year. “Lufthansa Cargo is one of our most important carriers,” Dr. Mathur confirms. The business relationship, which has existed since 2004, also often includes the transportation of time-critical shipments and of products that have just been launched. “The quality and efficacy of our medicines must be 100 percent – and that includes the absolute reliability of storage and transportation,” Dr. Mathur explains. “And Lufthansa Cargo has a sharp awareness for our requirements.

 
www.drreddys.com

Photos:

Sanjay Austa

In addition, a further development is available in the form of the Opticooler. Instead of dry ice, the cooling system here uses ­compressors. Both container variants are used in the framework of the product Cool/td-Active. Lufthansa Cargo can also rely on state-of-the-art infrastructure at the airport of the “pharma city” Hyderabad, via which Dr. Reddy’s has a substantial share of its exports shipped. The cargo area has only existed in its current form since 2008, and the Pharma Zone was first opened in 2011.

Goods from around 20 medicines manufacturers are regularly handled here. In addition to the area for 15- to 25-degree products such as the gastrointestinal capsules, there is one for even more sensitive products, which have to stored and transported at temperatures between two and eight degrees Celsius. What is more, there is a sterile zone for each category.

Dr. Reddy’s is a key customer.

“Inside India, Dr. Reddy’s is one of our key customers,” says Lufthansa Cargo manager Koppireddy Venugopal Raju, who is responsible there for this company. “And here in Hyderabad in particular, Dr. Reddy’s is the biggest customer in terms of tonnage.” In 2011, a total of about 1,500 metric tons was transported for the manufacturer, and there has been an upward trend year on year.

“Lufthansa Cargo is one of our most important carriers,” Dr. Mathur confirms. The business relationship, which has existed since 2004, also often includes the transportation of time-critical shipments and of products that have just been launched. “The quality and efficacy of our medicines must be 100 percent – and that includes the absolute reliability of storage and transportation,” Dr. Mathur explains. “And Lufthansa Cargo has a sharp awareness for our requirements.


www.drreddys.com

 

Photos:

Sanjay Austa

Story Image

Oil is a mentality.

CEVA Logistics in Houston puts a special focus on the energy sector. Lufthansa Cargo helps it to reliably supply equipment to oil and gas companies worldwide.

If you’re trying to get a good share in the Houston market, you’d better talk service first and price second,” says Bruce Hulings, Vice President Energy Services from CEVA Logistics. That’s how the oil and gas industry had always worked here. Houston is the energy capital of the U.S. as well as one of the most important centers of the American economy: 28 of the country’s 500 biggest companies have their headquarters here – only New York has more.

And with a turnover of 6.8 billion euros, CEVA is also on the famous Fortune list. “Our customers include four of the six biggest oil and gas companies,” says Hulings. “On top of that, we supply to 400 of the world’s 700 oil platforms. The energy sector accounts for a total of six percent of our turnover.”

Story Image

The industry is still a strong growth driver for the U.S. economy. Lufthansa Cargo has also recognized the potential of the Texas capital and started services with AeroLogic to Houston Bush Intercontinental Airport in April this year.

An MD-11 connection was added in June. This market entry has had a very positive impact on the business of CEVA. “Now that Lufthansa Cargo also operates directly from Houston, we save time,” explains Bonnie Martin, Senior Logistics Manager. “Trucking to Dallas, for example, is no longer absolutely necessary.” And the time factor plays a tremendously important role. 

Story Image

“When you look at the size and the value of the cargo that is needed by the industry, it’s obvious that this cannot be kept in stock at the required destinations,” says Greg Weigel, Executive Vice President Global Airfreight at CEVA.

“If a customer says he has to have something within 24 hours at a certain location, it just has to be there at that point in time. Otherwise, his company could lose several hundreds of thousands of dollars a day.”

Story Image

Somewhat out-of-the-ordinary destinations are the special challenge here. As a rule, equipment for the oil and gas industry is not destined for the big hubs, but much more often for South America or West Africa.

“We need the reliability of Lufthansa Cargo that our freight is not only arriving punctually in Frankfurt, but that it also makes the connection on time to, for example, Ghana or Equatorial Guinea,” Weigel emphasizes.

Bruce Hulings adds: “We need a partner who lives the service idea, who listens and always tries to make everything possible. The oil business is a mentality. It’s not as if I’m going into a store to buy some jeans, and, if they don’t happen to be in stock, I simply come back next week. Lufthansa Cargo and CEVA share the same principles of service and excellence – all over the world.”   

CEVA Logistics in figures.

Turnover: 6.8 billion euros (2010)

Employees: over 46,000

Logistics service provider ranking: Number 4 (worldwide)

Ranking IATA: Number 6 (worldwide)

Business locations: 1,200 in over 170 countries

Warehousing capacity: 10 million square meters

 

Photos:

Bruce Benett

CEVA Logistics in figures.

Turnover: 6.8 billion euros (2010)
Employees: over 46,000
Logistics service provider ranking: Number 4 (worldwide)
Ranking IATA:  Number 6 (worldwide)
Business locations:  1,200 in over 170 countries
Warehousing capacity:  10 million square meters

 

Photos:

Bruce Benett