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eAWB on course.

Hellmann in Hong Kong ships airfreight via Lufthansa Cargo with 100 percent eFreight implementation using electronic Air Waybills. This saves time and money and improves the quality of the airfreight data.

Hong Kong’s Chek Lap Kok Airport, April 29 2013. The teams from Lufthansa Cargo and Hellmann Worldwide Logistics eagerly await the handling of the first shipment via the electronic Air Waybill (eAWB). Have the experts taken everything into account? Will the system work smoothly? As the freighter takes to the skies, they know: the meticulous preparations by the airline and the shipper have paid off. In Hong Kong, this is the ‘go live’ date for Hellmann Worldwide Logistics’ entrance into the era of the eAWB.

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Today, one year later, the tension is gone. For Mark Hellmann and his team, the eAWB is a piece of everyday business. The company now produces more than 1,000 eAWBs per month: “Today, we ship our airfreight with Lufthansa Cargo 100 percent with eAWBs,” says Hellmann. The 54-year-old is President & CEO-Asia of Hellmann Worldwide Logistics and International Executive Board Member and Main Board Member of the huge logistics company.

And he is one of the pace-setters for eFreight implementation. Hellmann in Hong Kong has been working together with Lufthansa Cargo since 1987 and now ships around 5,000 tons of airfreight per annum via the airline with the crane emblem – 100 percent with eAWBs. “In the very first year, the company became our top eAWB partner,” says Rüdiger Helm, Regional Director South China & Taiwan at Lufthansa Cargo.

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One of Mark Hellmann’s goals for his 2,000 employees is clear: “100 percent electronic Air Waybill.” The fact that the Asian Hellmann network he runs has now fully switched to eAWB is not connected in any way with Mark Hellmann doing Lufthansa Cargo a favor: “This is a win-win situation. We have considerably improved our efficiencies. We save time and costs, and let us also not forget the sustainability effect,” says Hellmann.

The airline has focused on good collaboration with the company right from the start. The IT systems were synchronized and Hellmann staff trained in Lufthansa Cargo workshops. “Through close coordination we have been able to overcome the technical challenges that accompany Hellmann’s specific processes,” Helm recalls. “With customized solutions we have also been able to integrate Hellmann Hong Kong’s co-loader system into the eAWB processes,” he adds, outlining the initial eFreight phase.

Whether garments, footwear, electronics, automotive products, ­perishables, exhibition or healthcare goods – Hellmann Hong Kong’s wide variety of cargo requires sophisticated handling. 

For this reason too, Mark Hellmann views the eAWB as a great step forward: “Implementing eAWBs has allowed us to considerably increase the quality of our data shared with Lufthansa Cargo. This in turn has resulted in time savings and cost savings.”

Yet Hellmann looks even further ahead: “Sustainability is part of our corporate DNA, not only in Hong Kong but around the world. All our employees are encouraged to be sensitive and responsible to the people, communities and environments in their region. The eFreight initiative is part of our environmental responsibility to reduce our carbon footprint and paper waste.”

This is also why Hellmann does not want Hong Kong to remain an eFreight island. Chek Lap Kok, Hong Kong’s ultra-modern airport, is the perfect point of departure for the eFreight initiative. But Mark Hellmann also wants the other Asian stations to operate with eAWBs: “Of course we are planning to implement the eFreight initiative not only in our offices in China but across Asia. Our operating systems are standardized and we can use best practices learned with Lufthansa in Hong Kong to roll out across Asia.”
    
Lufthansa Cargo pursues the same approach here. With a new, customer-friendly process the airfreight carrier will be further opening its network in the next two years for eAWB delivery. 

At the stations, Lufthansa Cargo actively accompanies this rollout, organizes data quality workshops in cooperation with the customers and creates the necessary IT interfaces. For the pilot station in Munich the new process has already become reality and the rollout of the Frankfurt hub is forthcoming at the middle of the year. Further stations such as Singapore, Los Angeles, Chicago, Vienna and Milan are getting ready for this move.

eFreight: Lufthansa Cargo’s three-stage plan.

MAWB > eAWB
More and more forwarders are signing the required framework agreements (eAWB Multilateral Agreement) and preparing their IT for the electronic process. With the launch of eAWBs an electronic standard message (FWB) replaces the paper MAWB (Master Air Waybill). The eAWB ratio targeted by the cargo carrier for 2015 is 80 percent.

HAWB > eHAWB
Digitalized HAWBs (House Air Waybills) are already required by ­numerous customs authorities today. However, there is still an urgent need for agreement, as there is as yet no industrial standard for the eHouse Manifest.

Pouch > ePouch
Today, around 75 percent of shipments are still sent with a Pouch and the correspond­ing documents, since a substantial number of authorities expect original documents. Trade documents and customs documents are nonetheless also available as PDFs, thus enabling a digitalization of the entire documentation process.

Photos:

Egill Bjarki, Sven Schröder

planet 1/2014

Whether garments, footwear, electronics, automotive products, ­perishables, exhibition or healthcare goods – Hellmann Hong Kong’s wide variety of cargo requires sophisticated handling. 

For this reason too, Mark Hellmann views the eAWB as a great step forward: “Implementing eAWBs has allowed us to considerably increase the quality of our data shared with Lufthansa Cargo. This in turn has resulted in time savings and cost savings.”

Yet Hellmann looks even further ahead: “Sustainability is part of our corporate DNA, not only in Hong Kong but around the world. All our employees are encouraged to be sensitive and responsible to the people, communities and environments in their region. The eFreight initiative is part of our environmental responsibility to reduce our carbon footprint and paper waste.”

This is also why Hellmann does not want Hong Kong to remain an eFreight island. Chek Lap Kok, Hong Kong’s ultra-modern airport, is the perfect point of departure for the eFreight initiative. But Mark Hellmann also wants the other Asian stations to operate with eAWBs: “Of course we are planning to implement the eFreight initiative not only in our offices in China but across Asia. Our operating systems are standardized and we can use best practices learned with Lufthansa in Hong Kong to roll out across Asia.”

Lufthansa Cargo pursues the same approach here. With a new, customer-friendly process the airfreight carrier will be further opening its network in the next two years for eAWB delivery.

At the stations, Lufthansa Cargo actively accompanies this rollout, organizes data quality workshops in cooperation with the customers and creates the necessary IT interfaces. For the pilot station in Munich the new process has already become reality and the rollout of the Frankfurt hub is forthcoming at the middle of the year. Further stations such as Singapore, Los Angeles, Chicago, Vienna and Milan are getting ready for this move.

eFreight: Lufthansa Cargo’s three-stage plan.

MAWB > eAWB
More and more forwarders are signing the required framework agreements (eAWB Multilateral Agreement) and preparing their IT for the electronic process. With the launch of eAWBs an electronic standard message (FWB) replaces the paper MAWB (Master Air Waybill). The eAWB ratio targeted by the cargo carrier for 2015 is 80 percent.

HAWB > eHAWB
Digitalized HAWBs (House Air Waybills) are already required by ­numerous customs authorities today. However, there is still an urgent need for agreement, as there is as yet no industrial standard for the eHouse Manifest.

Pouch > ePouch
Today, around 75 percent of shipments are still sent with a Pouch and the correspond­ing documents, since a substantial number of authorities expect original documents. Trade documents and customs documents are nonetheless also available as PDFs, thus enabling a digitalization of the entire documentation process.

 

Photos:

Egill Bjarki, Sven Schröder

planet 1/2014